Comparison of Mercury Contamination in Live and Dead Dolphins from a Newly Described Species, Tursiops australis

Alissa MONK, Kate Charlton-Robb, Saman Buddhadasa, Ross THOMPSON

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Globally it is estimated that up to 37% of all marine mammals are at a risk of extinction, due in particular to human impacts, including coastal pollution. Dolphins are known to be at risk from anthropogenic contaminants due to their longevity and high trophic position. While it is known that beach-cast animals are often high in contaminants, it has not been possible to determine whether levels may also be high in live animals from the same populations. In this paper we quantitatively assess mercury contamination in the two main populations of a newly described dolphin species from south eastern Australia, Tursiops australis. This species appear to be limited to coastal waters in close proximity to a major urban centre, and as such is likely to be vulnerable to anthropogenic pollution. For the first time, we were able to compare blubber mercury concentrations from biopsy samples of live individuals and necropsies of beach-cast animals and show that beach-cast animals were highly contaminated with mercury, at almost three times the levels found in live animals. Levels in live animals were also high, and are attributable to chronic low dose exposure to mercury from the dolphin’s diet. Measurable levels of mercury were found in a number of important prey fish species. This illustrates the potential for low dose toxins in the environment to pass through marine food webs and potentially contribute to marine mammal deaths. This study demonstrates the potential use of blubber from biopsy samples to make inferences about the health of dolphins exposed to mercury.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-6
    Number of pages6
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume9
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Tursiops
    Dolphins
    dolphins
    Mercury
    mercury
    Animals
    Contamination
    Beaches
    beaches
    blubber
    animals
    Mammals
    Biopsy
    marine mammals
    biopsy
    Pollution
    pollution
    Impurities
    South Australia
    Food Chain

    Cite this

    MONK, Alissa ; Charlton-Robb, Kate ; Buddhadasa, Saman ; THOMPSON, Ross. / Comparison of Mercury Contamination in Live and Dead Dolphins from a Newly Described Species, Tursiops australis. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 8. pp. 1-6.
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    abstract = "Globally it is estimated that up to 37{\%} of all marine mammals are at a risk of extinction, due in particular to human impacts, including coastal pollution. Dolphins are known to be at risk from anthropogenic contaminants due to their longevity and high trophic position. While it is known that beach-cast animals are often high in contaminants, it has not been possible to determine whether levels may also be high in live animals from the same populations. In this paper we quantitatively assess mercury contamination in the two main populations of a newly described dolphin species from south eastern Australia, Tursiops australis. This species appear to be limited to coastal waters in close proximity to a major urban centre, and as such is likely to be vulnerable to anthropogenic pollution. For the first time, we were able to compare blubber mercury concentrations from biopsy samples of live individuals and necropsies of beach-cast animals and show that beach-cast animals were highly contaminated with mercury, at almost three times the levels found in live animals. Levels in live animals were also high, and are attributable to chronic low dose exposure to mercury from the dolphin’s diet. Measurable levels of mercury were found in a number of important prey fish species. This illustrates the potential for low dose toxins in the environment to pass through marine food webs and potentially contribute to marine mammal deaths. This study demonstrates the potential use of blubber from biopsy samples to make inferences about the health of dolphins exposed to mercury.",
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    Comparison of Mercury Contamination in Live and Dead Dolphins from a Newly Described Species, Tursiops australis. / MONK, Alissa; Charlton-Robb, Kate; Buddhadasa, Saman; THOMPSON, Ross.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 8, 2014, p. 1-6.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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