Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups

Gregor URBAS

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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Abstract

Telecommunications technologies have changed not only the ways in which crimes are committed but also the ways in which offenders interact in committing them. The truism of “action at a distance” exemplified by online crime, whereby offenders and victims need not be located in the same place or even the same country, also holds for relationships between co-offenders. Online criminal groups can operate effectively without their members ever meeting in person, being able to recognize each other by sight, or knowing each other’s real names.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCybercrime Risks and Responses
EditorsRussell G Smith, Ray Chak-Chung Cheung, Laurie Yiu-Chung Lau
Place of PublicationUK
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages194-205
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781349557882
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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virtual reality
liability
doctrine
offender
offense
Group
telecommunication
human being

Cite this

URBAS, G. (2015). Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups. In R. G. Smith, R. C-C. Cheung, & L. Y-C. Lau (Eds.), Cybercrime Risks and Responses (pp. 194-205). UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
URBAS, Gregor. / Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups. Cybercrime Risks and Responses. editor / Russell G Smith ; Ray Chak-Chung Cheung ; Laurie Yiu-Chung Lau. UK : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. pp. 194-205
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URBAS, G 2015, Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups. in RG Smith, RC-C Cheung & LY-C Lau (eds), Cybercrime Risks and Responses. Palgrave Macmillan, UK, pp. 194-205.

Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups. / URBAS, Gregor.

Cybercrime Risks and Responses. ed. / Russell G Smith; Ray Chak-Chung Cheung; Laurie Yiu-Chung Lau. UK : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. p. 194-205.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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URBAS G. Complicity in Cyberspace: Applying Doctrines of Accessorial Liability to Online Groups. In Smith RG, Cheung RC-C, Lau LY-C, editors, Cybercrime Risks and Responses. UK: Palgrave Macmillan. 2015. p. 194-205