Contoured in-shoe foot orthoses increase mid-foot plantar contact area when compared with a flat insert during cycling

Jaquelin A Bousie, Peter Blanch, Thomas G McPoil, Bill Vicenzino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of contouring of an in-shoe foot orthosis on plantar contact area and surface pressure, as well as perceived comfort and support at the foot-orthosis interface during stationary cycling.

DESIGN: A randomised, repeated measures control study.

METHODS: Twelve cyclists performed steady-state seated cycling at a cadence of 90 rpm using a contoured orthosis and a flat insert of similar hardness. Contact area (CA) and plantar mean pressure (PP) were measured using the PEDAR® system, determined for seven discrete plantar regions and represented as the percentage of the total CA and PP respectively (CA% and PP%). Perceived comfort and support were rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS).

RESULTS: The contoured orthosis produced a significantly greater CA% at the medial midfoot (p=0.001) and lateral midfoot (p=0.009) with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 1.3 and 0.9 respectively. The contoured orthosis also produced a significantly greater PP% at the hallux (p=0.003) compared to the flat insert with a SMD of 1.1. There was a small non-significant effect (SMD<0.4) for the perceived comfort measures between conditions, but perceived support was significantly greater at the arch (p=0.000) and heel (p=0.013) with the contoured orthoses (SMD of 1.5 and 0.9, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Contoured orthoses influenced the plantar surface of the foot by increasing contact area as well as a perception of greater support at the midfoot while increasing relative pressure through the hallux when compared to a flat insert during stationary cycling. No difference in perceived comfort was noted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-4
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Foot Orthoses
Shoes
Orthotic Devices
Foot
Pressure
Hallux
Heel
Hardness
Visual Analog Scale

Cite this

@article{598a69a971a64524b037a518bd3c9da5,
title = "Contoured in-shoe foot orthoses increase mid-foot plantar contact area when compared with a flat insert during cycling",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of contouring of an in-shoe foot orthosis on plantar contact area and surface pressure, as well as perceived comfort and support at the foot-orthosis interface during stationary cycling.DESIGN: A randomised, repeated measures control study.METHODS: Twelve cyclists performed steady-state seated cycling at a cadence of 90 rpm using a contoured orthosis and a flat insert of similar hardness. Contact area (CA) and plantar mean pressure (PP) were measured using the PEDAR{\circledR} system, determined for seven discrete plantar regions and represented as the percentage of the total CA and PP respectively (CA{\%} and PP{\%}). Perceived comfort and support were rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS).RESULTS: The contoured orthosis produced a significantly greater CA{\%} at the medial midfoot (p=0.001) and lateral midfoot (p=0.009) with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 1.3 and 0.9 respectively. The contoured orthosis also produced a significantly greater PP{\%} at the hallux (p=0.003) compared to the flat insert with a SMD of 1.1. There was a small non-significant effect (SMD<0.4) for the perceived comfort measures between conditions, but perceived support was significantly greater at the arch (p=0.000) and heel (p=0.013) with the contoured orthoses (SMD of 1.5 and 0.9, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: Contoured orthoses influenced the plantar surface of the foot by increasing contact area as well as a perception of greater support at the midfoot while increasing relative pressure through the hallux when compared to a flat insert during stationary cycling. No difference in perceived comfort was noted.",
keywords = "Adult, Analysis of Variance, Bicycling, Biomechanical Phenomena, Consumer Behavior, Equipment Design, Female, Foot Orthoses, Forefoot, Human, Hallux, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pressure, Young Adult, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Randomized Controlled Trial",
author = "Bousie, {Jaquelin A} and Peter Blanch and McPoil, {Thomas G} and Bill Vicenzino",
note = "Crown Copyright {\circledC} 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2012.04.006",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "60--4",
journal = "Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

Contoured in-shoe foot orthoses increase mid-foot plantar contact area when compared with a flat insert during cycling. / Bousie, Jaquelin A; Blanch, Peter; McPoil, Thomas G; Vicenzino, Bill.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 60-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contoured in-shoe foot orthoses increase mid-foot plantar contact area when compared with a flat insert during cycling

AU - Bousie, Jaquelin A

AU - Blanch, Peter

AU - McPoil, Thomas G

AU - Vicenzino, Bill

N1 - Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of contouring of an in-shoe foot orthosis on plantar contact area and surface pressure, as well as perceived comfort and support at the foot-orthosis interface during stationary cycling.DESIGN: A randomised, repeated measures control study.METHODS: Twelve cyclists performed steady-state seated cycling at a cadence of 90 rpm using a contoured orthosis and a flat insert of similar hardness. Contact area (CA) and plantar mean pressure (PP) were measured using the PEDAR® system, determined for seven discrete plantar regions and represented as the percentage of the total CA and PP respectively (CA% and PP%). Perceived comfort and support were rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS).RESULTS: The contoured orthosis produced a significantly greater CA% at the medial midfoot (p=0.001) and lateral midfoot (p=0.009) with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 1.3 and 0.9 respectively. The contoured orthosis also produced a significantly greater PP% at the hallux (p=0.003) compared to the flat insert with a SMD of 1.1. There was a small non-significant effect (SMD<0.4) for the perceived comfort measures between conditions, but perceived support was significantly greater at the arch (p=0.000) and heel (p=0.013) with the contoured orthoses (SMD of 1.5 and 0.9, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: Contoured orthoses influenced the plantar surface of the foot by increasing contact area as well as a perception of greater support at the midfoot while increasing relative pressure through the hallux when compared to a flat insert during stationary cycling. No difference in perceived comfort was noted.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of contouring of an in-shoe foot orthosis on plantar contact area and surface pressure, as well as perceived comfort and support at the foot-orthosis interface during stationary cycling.DESIGN: A randomised, repeated measures control study.METHODS: Twelve cyclists performed steady-state seated cycling at a cadence of 90 rpm using a contoured orthosis and a flat insert of similar hardness. Contact area (CA) and plantar mean pressure (PP) were measured using the PEDAR® system, determined for seven discrete plantar regions and represented as the percentage of the total CA and PP respectively (CA% and PP%). Perceived comfort and support were rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS).RESULTS: The contoured orthosis produced a significantly greater CA% at the medial midfoot (p=0.001) and lateral midfoot (p=0.009) with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 1.3 and 0.9 respectively. The contoured orthosis also produced a significantly greater PP% at the hallux (p=0.003) compared to the flat insert with a SMD of 1.1. There was a small non-significant effect (SMD<0.4) for the perceived comfort measures between conditions, but perceived support was significantly greater at the arch (p=0.000) and heel (p=0.013) with the contoured orthoses (SMD of 1.5 and 0.9, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: Contoured orthoses influenced the plantar surface of the foot by increasing contact area as well as a perception of greater support at the midfoot while increasing relative pressure through the hallux when compared to a flat insert during stationary cycling. No difference in perceived comfort was noted.

KW - Adult

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Bicycling

KW - Biomechanical Phenomena

KW - Consumer Behavior

KW - Equipment Design

KW - Female

KW - Foot Orthoses

KW - Forefoot, Human

KW - Hallux

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Pressure

KW - Young Adult

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Randomized Controlled Trial

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.04.006

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.04.006

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 60

EP - 64

JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

IS - 1

ER -