Coordinating known and unknown quantities in a multiplicative context: Problem conceptualization affordances and constraints

Ajay RAMFUL

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

In line with continuing efforts to explain the demanding nature of multiplicative reasoning
among middle-school students, this study explores the fine-grained knowledge elements that
two pairs of 7th and 8th graders deployed in their attempt to coordinate the known and
unknown quantities in the gear-wheel problem. Failure to conceptualize the multiplicative
relation in reverse, mainly due to the numeric feature of the problem parameters and
inherent inverse proportional relationship, led the students to use more primitive fallback
strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication35th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
Subtitle of host publicationMathematics Education: Expanding Horizons
EditorsJ Dindyal, L.P Cheng, S.F Ng
Place of PublicationAdelaide
PublisherMathematics Education Research Group of Australasia
Pages625-632
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9789810725273
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventAnnual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia 2012: Mathematics Education: Expanding Horizons - Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 2 Jul 20126 Jul 2012
https://merga.net.au/Public/Publications/Annual_Conference_Proceedings/2012_MERGA_CP.aspx

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia 2012
Abbreviated titleMERGA 2012
CountrySingapore
CitySingapore
Period2/07/126/07/12
Internet address

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RAMFUL, A. (2012). Coordinating known and unknown quantities in a multiplicative context: Problem conceptualization affordances and constraints. In J. Dindyal, L. P. Cheng, & S. F. Ng (Eds.), 35th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia: Mathematics Education: Expanding Horizons (pp. 625-632). Adelaide: Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia.