Cost, price and profit

what influences students’ decisions about fundraising?

Carly Sawatzki, Merrilyn Goos

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article examines some of the complexities associated with developing financially literate, enterprising young Australians through school education. We aimed to explore what seems to influence students in pricing goods for sale within their school community. Data were collected from more than 300 years 5 and 6 students (10–12 years of age) in four government primary schools in urban Darwin. Students were asked to respond to problem contexts involving fundraising as an example of an enterprise activity. The findings reveal that familiarity with fundraising initiatives, personal values, and language and literacy skills shaped the responses students gave. Students who gave loss-making and break-even responses were price conscious, but also tended to confuse terminology influencing mathematisation—i.e., “cost”, “price” and “profit”. Students who gave profit-making responses applied reasoning that was mathematical, financial and entrepreneurial, giving explanations that distinguished between these terms. We argue that these insights contribute to our understanding how upper primary school students interpret and respond to financial problems, with useful implications for schools and teachers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)525-544
    Number of pages20
    JournalMathematics Education Research Journal
    Volume30
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

    Fingerprint

    fundraising
    Profit
    profit
    Costs
    costs
    student
    Pricing
    Reasoning
    primary school
    Term
    school education
    Influence
    sale
    technical language
    school
    pricing
    literacy
    teacher
    language
    community

    Cite this

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    Cost, price and profit : what influences students’ decisions about fundraising? / Sawatzki, Carly; Goos, Merrilyn.

    In: Mathematics Education Research Journal, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.12.2018, p. 525-544.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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