Countering the conceits of the Anthropos

scaling down and researching with minor players

Affrica Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The naming of the Anthropocene (or epoch of Man) portends precarious futures for twenty-first century children. In deciding how best to respond, feminist scholars warn against perpetuating the heroicism and grandiosity of Man-to-the-rescue scripts. Instead they suggest paying close attention to what is already going on in the world beyond the dominion of Man, and refiguring our place in this more-than-human world by telling different kinds of stories. The author responds by recounting minor stories from a common worlds research project about a group of young Australian children's confronting encounters with wild European rabbits. These stories illustrate how assumed-to-be minor players are quietly getting on with the job of inheriting and cohabiting damaged worlds without recourse to human heroicism and dominion. She argues that by scaling down, researching and thinking with minor players outside of the main game, childhood studies is well positioned to counter the conceits of the Anthropos.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalDiscourse
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

scaling
recourse
twenty-first century
research project
childhood
Group

Cite this

@article{dacbed4fd89d4c4bada99a6d14a16c74,
title = "Countering the conceits of the Anthropos: scaling down and researching with minor players",
abstract = "The naming of the Anthropocene (or epoch of Man) portends precarious futures for twenty-first century children. In deciding how best to respond, feminist scholars warn against perpetuating the heroicism and grandiosity of Man-to-the-rescue scripts. Instead they suggest paying close attention to what is already going on in the world beyond the dominion of Man, and refiguring our place in this more-than-human world by telling different kinds of stories. The author responds by recounting minor stories from a common worlds research project about a group of young Australian children's confronting encounters with wild European rabbits. These stories illustrate how assumed-to-be minor players are quietly getting on with the job of inheriting and cohabiting damaged worlds without recourse to human heroicism and dominion. She argues that by scaling down, researching and thinking with minor players outside of the main game, childhood studies is well positioned to counter the conceits of the Anthropos.",
keywords = "Anthropocene, childhood studies, common worlds research, conceits of Man, feminist refiguring, minor players, scaling down",
author = "Affrica Taylor",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1080/01596306.2019.1583822",
language = "English",
pages = "1--19",
journal = "Discourse",
issn = "0159-6306",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

Countering the conceits of the Anthropos : scaling down and researching with minor players. / Taylor, Affrica.

In: Discourse, 22.02.2019, p. 1-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Countering the conceits of the Anthropos

T2 - scaling down and researching with minor players

AU - Taylor, Affrica

PY - 2019/2/22

Y1 - 2019/2/22

N2 - The naming of the Anthropocene (or epoch of Man) portends precarious futures for twenty-first century children. In deciding how best to respond, feminist scholars warn against perpetuating the heroicism and grandiosity of Man-to-the-rescue scripts. Instead they suggest paying close attention to what is already going on in the world beyond the dominion of Man, and refiguring our place in this more-than-human world by telling different kinds of stories. The author responds by recounting minor stories from a common worlds research project about a group of young Australian children's confronting encounters with wild European rabbits. These stories illustrate how assumed-to-be minor players are quietly getting on with the job of inheriting and cohabiting damaged worlds without recourse to human heroicism and dominion. She argues that by scaling down, researching and thinking with minor players outside of the main game, childhood studies is well positioned to counter the conceits of the Anthropos.

AB - The naming of the Anthropocene (or epoch of Man) portends precarious futures for twenty-first century children. In deciding how best to respond, feminist scholars warn against perpetuating the heroicism and grandiosity of Man-to-the-rescue scripts. Instead they suggest paying close attention to what is already going on in the world beyond the dominion of Man, and refiguring our place in this more-than-human world by telling different kinds of stories. The author responds by recounting minor stories from a common worlds research project about a group of young Australian children's confronting encounters with wild European rabbits. These stories illustrate how assumed-to-be minor players are quietly getting on with the job of inheriting and cohabiting damaged worlds without recourse to human heroicism and dominion. She argues that by scaling down, researching and thinking with minor players outside of the main game, childhood studies is well positioned to counter the conceits of the Anthropos.

KW - Anthropocene

KW - childhood studies

KW - common worlds research

KW - conceits of Man

KW - feminist refiguring

KW - minor players

KW - scaling down

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062343149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01596306.2019.1583822

DO - 10.1080/01596306.2019.1583822

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 19

JO - Discourse

JF - Discourse

SN - 0159-6306

ER -