Creative research: A radical subjectivity?

Shane STRANGE

    Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

    Abstract

    The struggles around notions of creative research are in some ways engaged with the return of the subject in the face of post/structuralist moves that have tried to evacuate or dissolve subjectivity, or reduce it to an element in a structure. What this kind of subjectivity is, and how to define it, seems up for grabs. What I suggest is that creative research is trying to stretch beyond its boundaries by advocating for a knowledgeproducing subjectivity that rejects the methodological positivism of so-called real research (which in many ways is centred upon the presupposition of a transcendental subject), while negotiating the discourses of postmodernity and post/structuralism which are suspicious of, or radically dismiss, subjectivity as a category. I suggest that creative research might be a radical gesture, indeed a radical subjectivity, whose possibilities as critical/creative practices reveal the human content of the seemingly autonomous forms which are the outcome of the fragmentary world of capitalist social relations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-11
    Number of pages11
    JournalTEXT: Journal of Writing and Writing Courses
    Issue number14
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    subjectivity
    post-structuralism
    positivism
    Social Relations
    discourse

    Cite this

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    Creative research: A radical subjectivity? / STRANGE, Shane.

    In: TEXT: Journal of Writing and Writing Courses, No. 14, 2012, p. 1-11.

    Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

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