Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents

Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?

Serena Bauducco, Kelly MAZZER, Katja Boersma, Steven Linton

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Poster

Abstract

Sleep duration decreases from puberty throughout adolescence. This decrease is normative and is due to both biological and psychosocial changes that push adolescents´ bedtimes later. However, there are indications that a decrease in sleep duration in adolescents have worsened during the last 20 years (Maslowsky et al., 2014). So, biological changes do not explain the current decline in sleep duration fully. One mechanisms that has been hypothesized explaining this change is the development of new technologies and internet accessibility around the clock. However, the majority of studies investigating the relationship between poor sleep and technology use at bedtime are cross-sectional. Thus, it cannot be excluded that adolescents use technology because they cannot fall asleep. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test whether technology use at bedtime predicted longer sleep onset latency (= time to fall asleep), or vice versa using cross lagged analyses over a 3-year period. Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2552; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 (T1), 2015 (T2) and 2016 (T3) (85% retention rate). Survey data included one question about technology use at bedtime and sleep onset latency (SOL). Technology use at bedtime significantly predicted longer SOL and vice versa from T1 to T2. From T2 to T3 sleep predicted technology use but not vice versa. This is the first study to investigate the reciprocal association between sleep and technology use in an adolescent population. It seems as technology use at bedtime and long sleep onset latency perpetuate each other in early adolescence, but later on it might be that adolescents who have a sleep problem use technology as a way to cope with it.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology - Utrecht, Netherlands
Duration: 29 Aug 20171 Sep 2017
https://www.ecdp2017.nl/

Conference

Conference18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology
CountryNetherlands
CityUtrecht
Period29/08/171/09/17
Internet address

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Sleep
Technology
Students
Puberty
Sweden
Internet
Population

Cite this

Bauducco, S., MAZZER, K., Boersma, K., & Linton, S. (2017). Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents: Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?. 1-1. Poster session presented at 18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, Netherlands.
Bauducco, Serena ; MAZZER, Kelly ; Boersma, Katja ; Linton, Steven. / Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents : Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?. Poster session presented at 18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, Netherlands.1 p.
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abstract = "Sleep duration decreases from puberty throughout adolescence. This decrease is normative and is due to both biological and psychosocial changes that push adolescents´ bedtimes later. However, there are indications that a decrease in sleep duration in adolescents have worsened during the last 20 years (Maslowsky et al., 2014). So, biological changes do not explain the current decline in sleep duration fully. One mechanisms that has been hypothesized explaining this change is the development of new technologies and internet accessibility around the clock. However, the majority of studies investigating the relationship between poor sleep and technology use at bedtime are cross-sectional. Thus, it cannot be excluded that adolescents use technology because they cannot fall asleep. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test whether technology use at bedtime predicted longer sleep onset latency (= time to fall asleep), or vice versa using cross lagged analyses over a 3-year period. Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2552; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 (T1), 2015 (T2) and 2016 (T3) (85{\%} retention rate). Survey data included one question about technology use at bedtime and sleep onset latency (SOL). Technology use at bedtime significantly predicted longer SOL and vice versa from T1 to T2. From T2 to T3 sleep predicted technology use but not vice versa. This is the first study to investigate the reciprocal association between sleep and technology use in an adolescent population. It seems as technology use at bedtime and long sleep onset latency perpetuate each other in early adolescence, but later on it might be that adolescents who have a sleep problem use technology as a way to cope with it.",
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Bauducco, S, MAZZER, K, Boersma, K & Linton, S 2017, 'Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents: Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?' 18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, Netherlands, 29/08/17 - 1/09/17, pp. 1-1.

Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents : Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep? / Bauducco, Serena; MAZZER, Kelly; Boersma, Katja; Linton, Steven.

2017. 1-1 Poster session presented at 18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Poster

TY - CONF

T1 - Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents

T2 - Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?

AU - Bauducco, Serena

AU - MAZZER, Kelly

AU - Boersma, Katja

AU - Linton, Steven

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Sleep duration decreases from puberty throughout adolescence. This decrease is normative and is due to both biological and psychosocial changes that push adolescents´ bedtimes later. However, there are indications that a decrease in sleep duration in adolescents have worsened during the last 20 years (Maslowsky et al., 2014). So, biological changes do not explain the current decline in sleep duration fully. One mechanisms that has been hypothesized explaining this change is the development of new technologies and internet accessibility around the clock. However, the majority of studies investigating the relationship between poor sleep and technology use at bedtime are cross-sectional. Thus, it cannot be excluded that adolescents use technology because they cannot fall asleep. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test whether technology use at bedtime predicted longer sleep onset latency (= time to fall asleep), or vice versa using cross lagged analyses over a 3-year period. Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2552; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 (T1), 2015 (T2) and 2016 (T3) (85% retention rate). Survey data included one question about technology use at bedtime and sleep onset latency (SOL). Technology use at bedtime significantly predicted longer SOL and vice versa from T1 to T2. From T2 to T3 sleep predicted technology use but not vice versa. This is the first study to investigate the reciprocal association between sleep and technology use in an adolescent population. It seems as technology use at bedtime and long sleep onset latency perpetuate each other in early adolescence, but later on it might be that adolescents who have a sleep problem use technology as a way to cope with it.

AB - Sleep duration decreases from puberty throughout adolescence. This decrease is normative and is due to both biological and psychosocial changes that push adolescents´ bedtimes later. However, there are indications that a decrease in sleep duration in adolescents have worsened during the last 20 years (Maslowsky et al., 2014). So, biological changes do not explain the current decline in sleep duration fully. One mechanisms that has been hypothesized explaining this change is the development of new technologies and internet accessibility around the clock. However, the majority of studies investigating the relationship between poor sleep and technology use at bedtime are cross-sectional. Thus, it cannot be excluded that adolescents use technology because they cannot fall asleep. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test whether technology use at bedtime predicted longer sleep onset latency (= time to fall asleep), or vice versa using cross lagged analyses over a 3-year period. Participants were high school students in the 7th and 8th grade (N = 2552; age range: 12-15 years, at baseline) from 17 public schools in three communities in middle Sweden. Students filled out questionnaires in school during the spring, 2014 (T1), 2015 (T2) and 2016 (T3) (85% retention rate). Survey data included one question about technology use at bedtime and sleep onset latency (SOL). Technology use at bedtime significantly predicted longer SOL and vice versa from T1 to T2. From T2 to T3 sleep predicted technology use but not vice versa. This is the first study to investigate the reciprocal association between sleep and technology use in an adolescent population. It seems as technology use at bedtime and long sleep onset latency perpetuate each other in early adolescence, but later on it might be that adolescents who have a sleep problem use technology as a way to cope with it.

M3 - Poster

SP - 1

EP - 1

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Bauducco S, MAZZER K, Boersma K, Linton S. Cross-lagged associations between sleep and technology in adolescents: Are teens using technology as a sleep aid or is technology disrupting their sleep?. 2017. Poster session presented at 18th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, Utrecht, Netherlands.