Cultural validation of the structured clinical interview for diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders in Indigenous Australians

Maree Toombs, Bushra Nasir, Steve Kisely, Geetha Ranmuthugala, Neeraj S. Gill, Gavin Beccaria, Noel Hayman, Srinivas N. Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Geoffrey C. Nicholson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study determined the cultural appropriateness of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) as an acceptable tool for diagnosing mental illness among Indigenous people. Methods: De-identified qualitative feedback from participants and psychologists regarding the cultural appropriateness of the SCID-I for Indigenous people using open-ended anonymous questionnaires was gathered. Aboriginal Medial Service staff and Indigenous Support Workers participated in a focus group. Results: A total of 95.6% of participants felt comfortable during the 498 questionnaires completed. Psychologists also provided qualitative feedback for 502 (92.3%) interviews, of whom 40.4% established a good rapport with participants. Of the participants, 77.7% understood the SCID-I questions well, while 72.5% did not require any cultural allowances to reach a clinical diagnosis. Conclusion: When administered by a culturally safe trained psychologist, SCID-I is well tolerated in this group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-365
Number of pages4
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

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