Culturally and linguistically diverse students in speech–language pathology courses

A platform for culturally responsive services

Stacie Attrill, Michelle Lincoln, Sue McAllister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Increasing the proportion of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students and providing intercultural learning opportunities for all students are two strategies identified to facilitate greater access to culturally responsive speech–language pathology services. To enact these strategies, more information is needed about student diversity. This study collected descriptive information about CALD speech–language pathology students in Australia. Method: Cultural and linguistic background information was collected through surveying 854 domestic and international speech-language pathology students from three Australian universities. Students were categorised according to defined or perceived CALD status, international student status, speaking English as an Additional Language (EAL), or speaking a Language Other than English at Home (LOTEH). Result: Overall, 32.1% of students were either defined or perceived CALD. A total of 14.9% spoke EAL and 25.7% identified speaking a LOTEH. CALD students were more likely to speak EAL or a LOTEH than non-CALD students, were prominently from Southern and South-Eastern Asian backgrounds and spoke related languages. Conclusion: Many students reported direct or indirect connections with their cultural heritage and/or contributed linguistic diversity. These students may represent broader acculturative experiences in communities. The sociocultural knowledge and experience of these students may provide intercultural learning opportunities for all students and promote culturally responsive practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-321
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Pathology
Students
Language
Linguistics
Learning
Speech-Language Pathology
English as an Additional Language
Speech-language Pathology
Surveying
Descriptive
Linguistic Diversity
Proportion
International Students
Cultural Heritage
Asia

Cite this

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title = "Culturally and linguistically diverse students in speech–language pathology courses: A platform for culturally responsive services",
abstract = "Purpose: Increasing the proportion of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students and providing intercultural learning opportunities for all students are two strategies identified to facilitate greater access to culturally responsive speech–language pathology services. To enact these strategies, more information is needed about student diversity. This study collected descriptive information about CALD speech–language pathology students in Australia. Method: Cultural and linguistic background information was collected through surveying 854 domestic and international speech-language pathology students from three Australian universities. Students were categorised according to defined or perceived CALD status, international student status, speaking English as an Additional Language (EAL), or speaking a Language Other than English at Home (LOTEH). Result: Overall, 32.1{\%} of students were either defined or perceived CALD. A total of 14.9{\%} spoke EAL and 25.7{\%} identified speaking a LOTEH. CALD students were more likely to speak EAL or a LOTEH than non-CALD students, were prominently from Southern and South-Eastern Asian backgrounds and spoke related languages. Conclusion: Many students reported direct or indirect connections with their cultural heritage and/or contributed linguistic diversity. These students may represent broader acculturative experiences in communities. The sociocultural knowledge and experience of these students may provide intercultural learning opportunities for all students and promote culturally responsive practices.",
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