Cyber Bullying in Australian Schools : the question of negligence and liability

A Dwyer, Patricia EASTEAL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bullying in schools is not a new phenomenon. The fact that children tend to ‘muck around’ and make fun of each other has meant that, historically, bullying has been viewed as a fait accompli, or something of a rite of passage for children and has not always been taken seriously by schools and adults. However, as awareness of the risks and potential injuries has heightened, bullying has been recognised as ‘a serious, and insidious, form of violence that plagues the school system.’ Cyber bullying, though, is relatively new. Any ‘communication activity using cyber technology’ that can be considered harmful, victimising, hostile or otherwise damaging to an individual or group of people, it can take many forms including harassment, threats, sexting, stalking, impersonation, predation, or any intimidating behaviour conducted using cyber technology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-95
Number of pages4
JournalAlternative Law Journal
Volume38
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

liability
exclusion
school
stalking
school system
ritual
threat
violence
communication
Group

Cite this

Dwyer, A ; EASTEAL, Patricia. / Cyber Bullying in Australian Schools : the question of negligence and liability. In: Alternative Law Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 92-95.
@article{f77a823d26e64838839c91ec260592f2,
title = "Cyber Bullying in Australian Schools : the question of negligence and liability",
abstract = "Bullying in schools is not a new phenomenon. The fact that children tend to ‘muck around’ and make fun of each other has meant that, historically, bullying has been viewed as a fait accompli, or something of a rite of passage for children and has not always been taken seriously by schools and adults. However, as awareness of the risks and potential injuries has heightened, bullying has been recognised as ‘a serious, and insidious, form of violence that plagues the school system.’ Cyber bullying, though, is relatively new. Any ‘communication activity using cyber technology’ that can be considered harmful, victimising, hostile or otherwise damaging to an individual or group of people, it can take many forms including harassment, threats, sexting, stalking, impersonation, predation, or any intimidating behaviour conducted using cyber technology.",
keywords = "cyber bullying, schools' liability, duty of care",
author = "A Dwyer and Patricia EASTEAL",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "92--95",
journal = "Alternative Law Journal",
issn = "1037-969X",
publisher = "Legal Service Bulletin Co-operative Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Cyber Bullying in Australian Schools : the question of negligence and liability. / Dwyer, A; EASTEAL, Patricia.

In: Alternative Law Journal, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2013, p. 92-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cyber Bullying in Australian Schools : the question of negligence and liability

AU - Dwyer, A

AU - EASTEAL, Patricia

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Bullying in schools is not a new phenomenon. The fact that children tend to ‘muck around’ and make fun of each other has meant that, historically, bullying has been viewed as a fait accompli, or something of a rite of passage for children and has not always been taken seriously by schools and adults. However, as awareness of the risks and potential injuries has heightened, bullying has been recognised as ‘a serious, and insidious, form of violence that plagues the school system.’ Cyber bullying, though, is relatively new. Any ‘communication activity using cyber technology’ that can be considered harmful, victimising, hostile or otherwise damaging to an individual or group of people, it can take many forms including harassment, threats, sexting, stalking, impersonation, predation, or any intimidating behaviour conducted using cyber technology.

AB - Bullying in schools is not a new phenomenon. The fact that children tend to ‘muck around’ and make fun of each other has meant that, historically, bullying has been viewed as a fait accompli, or something of a rite of passage for children and has not always been taken seriously by schools and adults. However, as awareness of the risks and potential injuries has heightened, bullying has been recognised as ‘a serious, and insidious, form of violence that plagues the school system.’ Cyber bullying, though, is relatively new. Any ‘communication activity using cyber technology’ that can be considered harmful, victimising, hostile or otherwise damaging to an individual or group of people, it can take many forms including harassment, threats, sexting, stalking, impersonation, predation, or any intimidating behaviour conducted using cyber technology.

KW - cyber bullying

KW - schools' liability

KW - duty of care

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 92

EP - 95

JO - Alternative Law Journal

JF - Alternative Law Journal

SN - 1037-969X

IS - 2

ER -