Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research

John Campbell, Craig McDonald

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Telework is a workplace arrangement in which employees have some degree of flexibility in work location and hours. The term 'Telework' was first coined in the 1970’s to describe situations where information and communication technologies were used to support work activities undertaken away form the traditional officebased workplace. The subsequent three decades have seen many published reports on the issues surrounding Telework adoption and use. However much of this research has only examined the advantages and disadvantages of Telework use and has not adopted broader research perspectives to examine the deeper issues and the roles played by the various affected stakeholder groups. Over the same period, the incidence of Telework has increased significantly. The motivation for this paper is to develop a conceptual model capable of providing clear direction for research into the adoption and use of Telework. We then examine the usefulness of this model by identifying and framing a series of research projects aimed at addressing some of the existing gaps in the literature concerning Telework impacts.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems
    EditorsM Toleman, A Cater-Steel, D Roberts
    Place of PublicationToowoomba, Australia
    PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
    Pages813-821
    Number of pages9
    ISBN (Print)9780909756963
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    Event18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems ACIS2007 - Toowoomba, Toowoomba, Australia
    Duration: 4 Dec 20077 Dec 2007

    Conference

    Conference18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems ACIS2007
    Abbreviated titleACIS2007
    CountryAustralia
    CityToowoomba
    Period4/12/077/12/07

    Fingerprint

    Conceptual framework
    Telework
    Work place
    Disadvantage
    Employees
    Usefulness
    Stakeholders
    Conceptual model
    Information and communication technology

    Cite this

    Campbell, J., & McDonald, C. (2007). Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research. In M. Toleman, A. Cater-Steel, & D. Roberts (Eds.), ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (pp. 813-821). Toowoomba, Australia: Association for Information Systems.
    Campbell, John ; McDonald, Craig. / Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research. ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems. editor / M Toleman ; A Cater-Steel ; D Roberts. Toowoomba, Australia : Association for Information Systems, 2007. pp. 813-821
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    title = "Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research",
    abstract = "Telework is a workplace arrangement in which employees have some degree of flexibility in work location and hours. The term 'Telework' was first coined in the 1970’s to describe situations where information and communication technologies were used to support work activities undertaken away form the traditional officebased workplace. The subsequent three decades have seen many published reports on the issues surrounding Telework adoption and use. However much of this research has only examined the advantages and disadvantages of Telework use and has not adopted broader research perspectives to examine the deeper issues and the roles played by the various affected stakeholder groups. Over the same period, the incidence of Telework has increased significantly. The motivation for this paper is to develop a conceptual model capable of providing clear direction for research into the adoption and use of Telework. We then examine the usefulness of this model by identifying and framing a series of research projects aimed at addressing some of the existing gaps in the literature concerning Telework impacts.",
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    Campbell, J & McDonald, C 2007, Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research. in M Toleman, A Cater-Steel & D Roberts (eds), ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems. Association for Information Systems, Toowoomba, Australia, pp. 813-821, 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems ACIS2007, Toowoomba, Australia, 4/12/07.

    Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research. / Campbell, John; McDonald, Craig.

    ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems. ed. / M Toleman; A Cater-Steel; D Roberts. Toowoomba, Australia : Association for Information Systems, 2007. p. 813-821.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    AU - McDonald, Craig

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    N2 - Telework is a workplace arrangement in which employees have some degree of flexibility in work location and hours. The term 'Telework' was first coined in the 1970’s to describe situations where information and communication technologies were used to support work activities undertaken away form the traditional officebased workplace. The subsequent three decades have seen many published reports on the issues surrounding Telework adoption and use. However much of this research has only examined the advantages and disadvantages of Telework use and has not adopted broader research perspectives to examine the deeper issues and the roles played by the various affected stakeholder groups. Over the same period, the incidence of Telework has increased significantly. The motivation for this paper is to develop a conceptual model capable of providing clear direction for research into the adoption and use of Telework. We then examine the usefulness of this model by identifying and framing a series of research projects aimed at addressing some of the existing gaps in the literature concerning Telework impacts.

    AB - Telework is a workplace arrangement in which employees have some degree of flexibility in work location and hours. The term 'Telework' was first coined in the 1970’s to describe situations where information and communication technologies were used to support work activities undertaken away form the traditional officebased workplace. The subsequent three decades have seen many published reports on the issues surrounding Telework adoption and use. However much of this research has only examined the advantages and disadvantages of Telework use and has not adopted broader research perspectives to examine the deeper issues and the roles played by the various affected stakeholder groups. Over the same period, the incidence of Telework has increased significantly. The motivation for this paper is to develop a conceptual model capable of providing clear direction for research into the adoption and use of Telework. We then examine the usefulness of this model by identifying and framing a series of research projects aimed at addressing some of the existing gaps in the literature concerning Telework impacts.

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    EP - 821

    BT - ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems

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    Campbell J, McDonald C. Defining a Conceptual Framework for Telework Research. In Toleman M, Cater-Steel A, Roberts D, editors, ACIS2007 : Proceedings of the 18th Australasian Conference on Information Systems. Toowoomba, Australia: Association for Information Systems. 2007. p. 813-821