Degree of cognitive impairment and mortality: A 17-year follow-up in a community study

J. Santabárbara, R. Lopez-Anton, G. Marcos, C. De-La-Cámara, E. Lobo, P. Saz, P. Gracia-Garciá, T. Ventura, A. Campayo, L. Rodríguez-Manãs, B. Olaya, J. M. Haro, L. Salvador-Carulla, N. Sartorius, A. Lobo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. To test the hypothesis that cognitive impairment in older adults is associated with all-cause mortality risk and the risk increases when the degree of cognitive impairment augments; and then, if this association is confirmed, to report the population-attributable fraction (PAF) of mortality due to cognitive impairment. Method. A representative random community sample of individuals aged over 55 was interviewed, and 4557 subjects remaining alive at the end of the first year of follow-up were included in the analysis. Instruments used in the assessment included the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), the History and Aetiology Schedule (HAS) and the Geriatric Mental State (GMS)-AGECAT. For the standardised degree of cognitive impairment Perneczky et al's MMSE criteria were applied. Mortality information was obtained from the official population registry. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the association between MMSE degrees of cognitive impairment and mortality risk. We also estimated the PAF of mortality due to specific MMSE stages. Results. Cognitive impairment was associated with mortality risk, the risk increasing in parallel with the degree of cognitive impairment (Hazard ratio, HR: 1.18 in the 'mild' degree of impairment; HR: 1.29 in the 'moderate' degree; and HR: 2.08 in the 'severe' degree). The PAF of mortality due to severe cognitive impairment was 3.49%. Conclusions. A gradient of increased mortality-risk associated with severity of cognitive impairment was observed. The results support the claim that routine assessment of cognitive function in older adults should be considered in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-511
Number of pages9
JournalEpidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

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