Density and LRT: case of Canberra, Australia

Cameron Gordon

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

Canberra, the capital of Australia, is a city with two modes of mechanised passenger travel: traditional bus and automobile. While Canberra is the capital of the country, it is a relatively small city, with a current population of approximately 340,000, and relatively spread out with a low overall average population density. Recently the local government (the government of the Australian Capital Territory) submitted a bid to the Australian federal government to fund a light-rail system for the city. This paper examines the issues of serving low and medium density communities with light rail, using Canberra as a case study. The study sets the scene by qualitatively and quantitatively characterising the socioeconomic and demographic profile of Canberra, with a focus on centres of population and economic density; reviews the literature on LRT for low-to-medium density areas; and analyses what an LRT in Canberra would look like if it is to be financially, operationally and environmentally sustainable.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransportation Research Board 89th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers
Place of PublicationWashington, USA
PublisherTransportation Research Board
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventTransportation Research Board (TRB) 89th Annual Meeting: Investing in Our Transportation Future ? BOLD Ideas to Meet BIG Challenges. - Washington, United States
Duration: 10 Jan 201014 Jan 2010

Conference

ConferenceTransportation Research Board (TRB) 89th Annual Meeting: Investing in Our Transportation Future ? BOLD Ideas to Meet BIG Challenges.
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period10/01/1014/01/10

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Gordon, C. (2010). Density and LRT: case of Canberra, Australia. In Transportation Research Board 89th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers (pp. 1-19). Washington, USA: Transportation Research Board.