Designing a warm-up protocol for elite bob-skeleton athletes

C. Cook, D. Holdcroft, S. Drawer, Liam P Kilduff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate how different warm-ups influenced subsequent sled-pull sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes as part of their preparation for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Methods: Three female and 3 male athletes performed 5 different randomized warm-ups of differing intensities, durations, and timing relative to subsequent testing, each 2 days apart, all repeated twice. After warm-ups, testing on a sledpull sprint over 20 m, 3 repeats 3 min apart, took place. Results: Performance testing showed improvement (P <.001, ES > 1.2) with both increasing intensity of warm-up and closeness of completion to testing, with 20-m sled sprinting being 0.1-0.25 s faster in higher-intensity protocols performed near testing In addition, supplementing the warm-ups by wearing of a light survival coat resulted in further performance improvement (P = .000, ES 1.8). Conclusions: Changing timing and intensity of warm-up and using an ancillary passive heat-retention device improved sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes. Subsequent adoption of these on the competitive circuit was associated with a seasonal improvement in push times and was ultimately implemented in the 2010 Winter Olympics. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-215
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Skeleton
Athletes
Hot Temperature
Light
Equipment and Supplies
Survival

Cite this

Cook, C., Holdcroft, D., Drawer, S., & Kilduff, L. P. (2013). Designing a warm-up protocol for elite bob-skeleton athletes. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 8(2), 213-215.
Cook, C. ; Holdcroft, D. ; Drawer, S. ; Kilduff, Liam P. / Designing a warm-up protocol for elite bob-skeleton athletes. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 213-215.
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Cook, C, Holdcroft, D, Drawer, S & Kilduff, LP 2013, 'Designing a warm-up protocol for elite bob-skeleton athletes', International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 213-215.

Designing a warm-up protocol for elite bob-skeleton athletes. / Cook, C.; Holdcroft, D.; Drawer, S.; Kilduff, Liam P.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2013, p. 213-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Holdcroft, D.

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N2 - Purpose: To investigate how different warm-ups influenced subsequent sled-pull sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes as part of their preparation for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Methods: Three female and 3 male athletes performed 5 different randomized warm-ups of differing intensities, durations, and timing relative to subsequent testing, each 2 days apart, all repeated twice. After warm-ups, testing on a sledpull sprint over 20 m, 3 repeats 3 min apart, took place. Results: Performance testing showed improvement (P <.001, ES > 1.2) with both increasing intensity of warm-up and closeness of completion to testing, with 20-m sled sprinting being 0.1-0.25 s faster in higher-intensity protocols performed near testing In addition, supplementing the warm-ups by wearing of a light survival coat resulted in further performance improvement (P = .000, ES 1.8). Conclusions: Changing timing and intensity of warm-up and using an ancillary passive heat-retention device improved sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes. Subsequent adoption of these on the competitive circuit was associated with a seasonal improvement in push times and was ultimately implemented in the 2010 Winter Olympics. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc.

AB - Purpose: To investigate how different warm-ups influenced subsequent sled-pull sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes as part of their preparation for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Methods: Three female and 3 male athletes performed 5 different randomized warm-ups of differing intensities, durations, and timing relative to subsequent testing, each 2 days apart, all repeated twice. After warm-ups, testing on a sledpull sprint over 20 m, 3 repeats 3 min apart, took place. Results: Performance testing showed improvement (P <.001, ES > 1.2) with both increasing intensity of warm-up and closeness of completion to testing, with 20-m sled sprinting being 0.1-0.25 s faster in higher-intensity protocols performed near testing In addition, supplementing the warm-ups by wearing of a light survival coat resulted in further performance improvement (P = .000, ES 1.8). Conclusions: Changing timing and intensity of warm-up and using an ancillary passive heat-retention device improved sprint performance in Olympic-level bob-skeleton athletes. Subsequent adoption of these on the competitive circuit was associated with a seasonal improvement in push times and was ultimately implemented in the 2010 Winter Olympics. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc.

KW - Body temperature

KW - Passive heat maintenance

KW - Sprint performance

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