Designing an Alternative, Community Integrated Model of Residential Aged Care for People Living with Dementia : Nominal Group Technique and Thematic Analysis: Nominal Group Technique and Thematic Analysis

Nathan M D'Cunha, Helen Holloway, Diane Gibson, Jane Thompson, Kasia Bail, Sue Kurrle, Sally Day, James Olson, Nicole Smith, Heather Clarke, Charise Buckley, Stephen Isbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
41 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Small-scale models of dementia care are a potential solution to deinstitutionalize residential aged care and have been associated with improved resident outcomes, including quality of life and reduced hospitalizations for people living with dementia. Objective: This study aimed to generate strategies and ideas on how homes for people living with dementia in a village setting within a suburban community, could be designed and function without external boundaries. In particular, how could residents of the village and members of the surrounding community access and engage safely and equitably so that interpersonal connections might be fostered? Methods: Twenty-one participants provided an idea for discussion at three Nominal Group Technique workshops, including people living with dementia, carers or former carers, academics, researchers, and clinicians. Discussion and ranking of ideas were facilitated in each workshop, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Results: All three workshops highlighted the importance of a surrounding community invested in the village; education and dementia awareness training for staff, families, services, and the community; and the necessity for adequately and appropriately trained staff. An appropriate mission, vision, and values of the organization providing care were deemed essential to facilitate an inclusive culture that promotes dignity of risk and meaningful activities. Conclusion: These principles can be used to develop an improved model of residential aged care for people living with dementia. In particular, inclusivity, enablement, and dignity of risk are essential principles for residents to live meaningful lives free from stigma in a village without external boundaries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1247-1263
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume94
Issue number3
Early online date24 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Designing an Alternative, Community Integrated Model of Residential Aged Care for People Living with Dementia : Nominal Group Technique and Thematic Analysis: Nominal Group Technique and Thematic Analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this