Development and Pilot Testing of the Eating4two Mobile Phone App to Monitor Gestational Weight Gain

Cathy KNIGHT-AGARWAL, Deborah DAVIS, Lauren Williams, Rachel DAVEY, Robert Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The number of pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30kg/m(2) or more is increasing, which has important implications for antenatal care. Various resource-intensive interventions have attempted to assist women in managing their weight gain during pregnancy with limited success. A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the process of developing and pilot testing the Eating4Two app, which aims to provide women with a simple gestational weight gain (GWG) calculator, general dietary information, and the motivation to achieve a healthy weight gain during pregnancy. METHODS: The project involved the development of app components, including a graphing function that allows the user to record their weight throughout the pregnancy and to receive real-time feedback on weight gain progress and general information on antenatal nutrition. Stakeholder consultation was used to inform development. The app was pilot tested with 10 pregnant women using a mixed method approach via an online survey, 2 focus groups, and 1 individual interview. RESULTS: The Eating4Two app took 7 months to develop and evaluate. It involved several disciplines--including nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, public health, and information technology--at the University of Canberra. Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain. They also liked the nutrition information; however, many felt it should be formatted in a more user friendly way. CONCLUSIONS: The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information. The feedback provided by participants will assist with refining the current prototype for use in a clinical intervention trial.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-1
Number of pages11
JournalJMIR mHealth and uHealth
Volume2015
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2015

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Mobile Applications
Cell Phones
Weight Gain
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Medical Informatics
Dietetics
Prenatal Care
Midwifery
Focus Groups
Body Mass Index
Referral and Consultation
Public Health
Clinical Trials
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

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title = "Development and Pilot Testing of the Eating4two Mobile Phone App to Monitor Gestational Weight Gain",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The number of pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30kg/m(2) or more is increasing, which has important implications for antenatal care. Various resource-intensive interventions have attempted to assist women in managing their weight gain during pregnancy with limited success. A mobile phone app has been proposed as a convenient and cost-effective alternative to face-to-face interventions. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the process of developing and pilot testing the Eating4Two app, which aims to provide women with a simple gestational weight gain (GWG) calculator, general dietary information, and the motivation to achieve a healthy weight gain during pregnancy. METHODS: The project involved the development of app components, including a graphing function that allows the user to record their weight throughout the pregnancy and to receive real-time feedback on weight gain progress and general information on antenatal nutrition. Stakeholder consultation was used to inform development. The app was pilot tested with 10 pregnant women using a mixed method approach via an online survey, 2 focus groups, and 1 individual interview. RESULTS: The Eating4Two app took 7 months to develop and evaluate. It involved several disciplines--including nutrition and dietetics, midwifery, public health, and information technology--at the University of Canberra. Participants found the Eating4Two app to be a motivational tool but would have liked scales or other markers on the graph that demonstrated exact weight gain. They also liked the nutrition information; however, many felt it should be formatted in a more user friendly way. CONCLUSIONS: The Eating4Two app was viewed by participants in our study as an innovative support system to help motivate healthy behaviors during pregnancy and as a credible resource for accessing nutrition-focused information. The feedback provided by participants will assist with refining the current prototype for use in a clinical intervention trial.",
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Development and Pilot Testing of the Eating4two Mobile Phone App to Monitor Gestational Weight Gain. / KNIGHT-AGARWAL, Cathy; DAVIS, Deborah; Williams, Lauren; DAVEY, Rachel; Cox, Robert.

In: JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Vol. 2015, No. 3, 05.06.2015, p. 2-1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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