Dietary intake and nutritional status of micronutrients in adults with cystic fibrosis in relation to current recommendations

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An increased prevalence of cystic fibrosis (CF) related complications such as impaired bone health and diabetes has accompanied increased survival of patients with CF. This review was conducted to determine the extent to which adults with CF are meeting current nutrition recommendations for micronutrients in association with CF-related complications management. Although dietary intake and nutritional status in CF has improved significantly in recent decades, micronutrient status seems to have diverged. While vitamin A and E intakes appear adequate, frequent vitamin D and K deficiency/insufficiency and compromised bone health in CF, occurs despite supplementation. Although deficiency of water-soluble vitamins and minerals is uncommon, ongoing surveillance will enhance overall health outcomes, particularly in cases of CF-related liver disease and deteriorated lung function and bone health. Salt and fluid status in CF may also need attention due to diminished thirst sensation and voluntary rehydration. Further investigation in micronutrient status optimisation in CF will inform the development of more effective and targeted nutrition therapies to enable integration of more refined recommendations for micronutrient intakes in CF based on individual needs and disease progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)775-782
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Micronutrients
Nutritional Status
Cystic Fibrosis
Health
Bone and Bones
Vitamin K Deficiency
Nutrition Therapy
Thirst
Vitamin D Deficiency
Fluid Therapy
Vitamin A
Vitamin E
Vitamins
Minerals
Disease Progression
Liver Diseases
Salts
Lung
Survival
Water

Cite this

@article{ead81c52f48e4754a9e24db09a1b51ac,
title = "Dietary intake and nutritional status of micronutrients in adults with cystic fibrosis in relation to current recommendations",
abstract = "An increased prevalence of cystic fibrosis (CF) related complications such as impaired bone health and diabetes has accompanied increased survival of patients with CF. This review was conducted to determine the extent to which adults with CF are meeting current nutrition recommendations for micronutrients in association with CF-related complications management. Although dietary intake and nutritional status in CF has improved significantly in recent decades, micronutrient status seems to have diverged. While vitamin A and E intakes appear adequate, frequent vitamin D and K deficiency/insufficiency and compromised bone health in CF, occurs despite supplementation. Although deficiency of water-soluble vitamins and minerals is uncommon, ongoing surveillance will enhance overall health outcomes, particularly in cases of CF-related liver disease and deteriorated lung function and bone health. Salt and fluid status in CF may also need attention due to diminished thirst sensation and voluntary rehydration. Further investigation in micronutrient status optimisation in CF will inform the development of more effective and targeted nutrition therapies to enable integration of more refined recommendations for micronutrient intakes in CF based on individual needs and disease progression.",
keywords = "Cystic Fibrosis/blood, Diet, Dietary Supplements, Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency/blood, Humans, Micronutrients/administration & dosage, Nutrition Assessment, Nutritional Status, Prevalence, Recommended Dietary Allowances",
author = "Li Li and Shawn Somerset",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clnu.2015.06.004",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "775--782",
journal = "Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0261-5614",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "4",

}

Dietary intake and nutritional status of micronutrients in adults with cystic fibrosis in relation to current recommendations. / Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn.

In: Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 775-782.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary intake and nutritional status of micronutrients in adults with cystic fibrosis in relation to current recommendations

AU - Li, Li

AU - Somerset, Shawn

PY - 2016/8/1

Y1 - 2016/8/1

N2 - An increased prevalence of cystic fibrosis (CF) related complications such as impaired bone health and diabetes has accompanied increased survival of patients with CF. This review was conducted to determine the extent to which adults with CF are meeting current nutrition recommendations for micronutrients in association with CF-related complications management. Although dietary intake and nutritional status in CF has improved significantly in recent decades, micronutrient status seems to have diverged. While vitamin A and E intakes appear adequate, frequent vitamin D and K deficiency/insufficiency and compromised bone health in CF, occurs despite supplementation. Although deficiency of water-soluble vitamins and minerals is uncommon, ongoing surveillance will enhance overall health outcomes, particularly in cases of CF-related liver disease and deteriorated lung function and bone health. Salt and fluid status in CF may also need attention due to diminished thirst sensation and voluntary rehydration. Further investigation in micronutrient status optimisation in CF will inform the development of more effective and targeted nutrition therapies to enable integration of more refined recommendations for micronutrient intakes in CF based on individual needs and disease progression.

AB - An increased prevalence of cystic fibrosis (CF) related complications such as impaired bone health and diabetes has accompanied increased survival of patients with CF. This review was conducted to determine the extent to which adults with CF are meeting current nutrition recommendations for micronutrients in association with CF-related complications management. Although dietary intake and nutritional status in CF has improved significantly in recent decades, micronutrient status seems to have diverged. While vitamin A and E intakes appear adequate, frequent vitamin D and K deficiency/insufficiency and compromised bone health in CF, occurs despite supplementation. Although deficiency of water-soluble vitamins and minerals is uncommon, ongoing surveillance will enhance overall health outcomes, particularly in cases of CF-related liver disease and deteriorated lung function and bone health. Salt and fluid status in CF may also need attention due to diminished thirst sensation and voluntary rehydration. Further investigation in micronutrient status optimisation in CF will inform the development of more effective and targeted nutrition therapies to enable integration of more refined recommendations for micronutrient intakes in CF based on individual needs and disease progression.

KW - Cystic Fibrosis/blood

KW - Diet

KW - Dietary Supplements

KW - Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency/blood

KW - Humans

KW - Micronutrients/administration & dosage

KW - Nutrition Assessment

KW - Nutritional Status

KW - Prevalence

KW - Recommended Dietary Allowances

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935497574&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clnu.2015.06.004

DO - 10.1016/j.clnu.2015.06.004

M3 - Review article

VL - 35

SP - 775

EP - 782

JO - Clinical Nutrition

JF - Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0261-5614

IS - 4

ER -