Differences in markers of cardiovascular disease between professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent

M. G. Wilson, B. Hamilton, A. L. Sandridge, O. Salah, H. Chalabi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the cardiovascular risk factors of professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent competing in the 2010/11 Qatar Stars League. Design: Ten out of twelve professional football clubs attended pre-participation screening. 100 West-Asian males from seven Gulf States and six Middle-Eastern countries and 90 Black males from seven African countries. Methods: All players were screened using the FIFA pre-competition medical assessment, incorporating a physical examination, resting 12-Lead ECG, echocardiogram, with determination of total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) and triglycerides. Results: West-Asian football players had a higher prevalence of a family history (FH) of coronary heart disease (CHD) (25% vs. 12%, p= 0.025) compared to Black African players predominantly due to CHD in their fathers (14% vs. 6%, p< 0.05). West-Asian players had higher total cholesterol levels (4.4 vs. 4.2. mmol/L, p= 0.025) and lower HDL levels (1.3 vs. 1.4. mmol/L, p= 0.004) than Black African players; remaining significant after adjusting for a FH of CHD. Positively, all lipid levels were clinically acceptable for both ethnicities. Finally, one in eight West-Asian and one in eleven Black African football players were regular smokers. Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in West-Asia is increasing. This study observed clinically acceptable blood lipid profiles for both West-Asian and Black African football players. However, West-Asian players had a greater number of markers for CVD than their Black African counterparts despite being matched for physical activity levels. Targeted education with regards to diet, lifestyle and tobacco use is required for both ethnicities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-271
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Football
Cardiovascular Diseases
Coronary Disease
Qatar
Lipids
Tobacco Use
Hypercholesterolemia
Fathers
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Physical Examination
Life Style
Electrocardiography
Exercise
Diet
Education

Cite this

Wilson, M. G. ; Hamilton, B. ; Sandridge, A. L. ; Salah, O. ; Chalabi, H. / Differences in markers of cardiovascular disease between professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2012 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 266-271.
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abstract = "Objectives: To examine the cardiovascular risk factors of professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent competing in the 2010/11 Qatar Stars League. Design: Ten out of twelve professional football clubs attended pre-participation screening. 100 West-Asian males from seven Gulf States and six Middle-Eastern countries and 90 Black males from seven African countries. Methods: All players were screened using the FIFA pre-competition medical assessment, incorporating a physical examination, resting 12-Lead ECG, echocardiogram, with determination of total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) and triglycerides. Results: West-Asian football players had a higher prevalence of a family history (FH) of coronary heart disease (CHD) (25{\%} vs. 12{\%}, p= 0.025) compared to Black African players predominantly due to CHD in their fathers (14{\%} vs. 6{\%}, p< 0.05). West-Asian players had higher total cholesterol levels (4.4 vs. 4.2. mmol/L, p= 0.025) and lower HDL levels (1.3 vs. 1.4. mmol/L, p= 0.004) than Black African players; remaining significant after adjusting for a FH of CHD. Positively, all lipid levels were clinically acceptable for both ethnicities. Finally, one in eight West-Asian and one in eleven Black African football players were regular smokers. Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in West-Asia is increasing. This study observed clinically acceptable blood lipid profiles for both West-Asian and Black African football players. However, West-Asian players had a greater number of markers for CVD than their Black African counterparts despite being matched for physical activity levels. Targeted education with regards to diet, lifestyle and tobacco use is required for both ethnicities.",
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Differences in markers of cardiovascular disease between professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent. / Wilson, M. G.; Hamilton, B.; Sandridge, A. L.; Salah, O.; Chalabi, H.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2012, p. 266-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Differences in markers of cardiovascular disease between professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent

AU - Wilson, M. G.

AU - Hamilton, B.

AU - Sandridge, A. L.

AU - Salah, O.

AU - Chalabi, H.

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N2 - Objectives: To examine the cardiovascular risk factors of professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent competing in the 2010/11 Qatar Stars League. Design: Ten out of twelve professional football clubs attended pre-participation screening. 100 West-Asian males from seven Gulf States and six Middle-Eastern countries and 90 Black males from seven African countries. Methods: All players were screened using the FIFA pre-competition medical assessment, incorporating a physical examination, resting 12-Lead ECG, echocardiogram, with determination of total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) and triglycerides. Results: West-Asian football players had a higher prevalence of a family history (FH) of coronary heart disease (CHD) (25% vs. 12%, p= 0.025) compared to Black African players predominantly due to CHD in their fathers (14% vs. 6%, p< 0.05). West-Asian players had higher total cholesterol levels (4.4 vs. 4.2. mmol/L, p= 0.025) and lower HDL levels (1.3 vs. 1.4. mmol/L, p= 0.004) than Black African players; remaining significant after adjusting for a FH of CHD. Positively, all lipid levels were clinically acceptable for both ethnicities. Finally, one in eight West-Asian and one in eleven Black African football players were regular smokers. Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in West-Asia is increasing. This study observed clinically acceptable blood lipid profiles for both West-Asian and Black African football players. However, West-Asian players had a greater number of markers for CVD than their Black African counterparts despite being matched for physical activity levels. Targeted education with regards to diet, lifestyle and tobacco use is required for both ethnicities.

AB - Objectives: To examine the cardiovascular risk factors of professional football players of West-Asian and Black African descent competing in the 2010/11 Qatar Stars League. Design: Ten out of twelve professional football clubs attended pre-participation screening. 100 West-Asian males from seven Gulf States and six Middle-Eastern countries and 90 Black males from seven African countries. Methods: All players were screened using the FIFA pre-competition medical assessment, incorporating a physical examination, resting 12-Lead ECG, echocardiogram, with determination of total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL/LDL) and triglycerides. Results: West-Asian football players had a higher prevalence of a family history (FH) of coronary heart disease (CHD) (25% vs. 12%, p= 0.025) compared to Black African players predominantly due to CHD in their fathers (14% vs. 6%, p< 0.05). West-Asian players had higher total cholesterol levels (4.4 vs. 4.2. mmol/L, p= 0.025) and lower HDL levels (1.3 vs. 1.4. mmol/L, p= 0.004) than Black African players; remaining significant after adjusting for a FH of CHD. Positively, all lipid levels were clinically acceptable for both ethnicities. Finally, one in eight West-Asian and one in eleven Black African football players were regular smokers. Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in West-Asia is increasing. This study observed clinically acceptable blood lipid profiles for both West-Asian and Black African football players. However, West-Asian players had a greater number of markers for CVD than their Black African counterparts despite being matched for physical activity levels. Targeted education with regards to diet, lifestyle and tobacco use is required for both ethnicities.

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JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

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