Digital health now and in the future

findings from a participatory design stakeholder workshop

Deborah Lupton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: While digital health technologies hold potential for improving healthcare and the generation and dissemination of health information, there are many issues to be resolved in facilitating their provision and efficacy and ensuring ethical management of personal health data. In the face of high-stakes digital health initiatives, debates and controversies, eliciting the views and experiences of the diverse constituents in the digital health ecosystem is important. Methods: A digital health stakeholder workshop was held in Canberra, Australia, to address two key questions: 1) What is currently working and not working in digital health? and 2) Where should digital health go in the future? As part of a living lab approach, the 25 workshop participants from research, industry, patient and other healthcare consumer groups and government, engaged in participatory design activities directed at stimulating ideas and discussion. The design artefacts and videos generated during the workshop were thematically analysed. Results: Digital health technologies offer valuable ways for healthcare consumers, providers, community groups and health industries to create and share information about health, medicine and healthcare. However, members of some social groups are currently excluded from full participation in the digital health ecosystem. Mechanisms for facilitating further consult-ation between the various stakeholders involved in digital health, including patients and carers, need to be established. The rights and responsibilities of the different stakeholders involved in connected digital health also need to be better identified and highlighted. At the same time, personal data privacy and security need protection. Conclusion: Establishing the effective and responsible delivery of digital health technologies and collection, protection and sharing of health data is highly complex. Infrastructure, ethical and social issues need to be considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalDigital Health
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2018

    Fingerprint

Cite this