Digitally connected but personally disconnected? Crisis, digital media and the Australian family

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Australia’s capital city greeted 2020 already in a state of crisis. The New South Wales South Coast, 150 or so kilometres away and a holiday haven for many Canberrans (including ourselves) was burning. The smoke from what came to be known as the Black Summer bushfires – which burned an area twice the size of Belgium – enveloped Canberra in a dangerous haze. On New Years’ Day, Canberra had the worst air quality in the world, with an air quality index more than 25 times hazardous levels (Remeikis, 2020). People were advised to stay indoors; businesses temporarily shut down; we began wearing facemasks. We never anticipated that these steps would be repeated, for completely unrelated but no less significant reasons, three months later.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-9
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Children and Media
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Mar 2021

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