Disaster resilience as a complex problem: why linearity is not applicable for long-term recovery

Deborah BLACKMAN, Hitomi NAKANISHI, Angela Benson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The paper proposes that a reason why long-term disaster initiatives fail is the adoption of a linear, complicated problem based approach rather than seeing recovery as a complex system. The argument is that initial post-disaster responses are complicated with a subsequent transition to a complex problem. Transition is proffered as a missing link between short-term responses (rescue and relief) and long-term disaster recovery. Case data from Japan and Christchurch suggests that three system elements influencing potential transition are: the actors and their purpose; new forms of social capital and a move to greater co-production with community. Influencing these effectively will support enhanced traction to achieve the move to long-term recovery.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)89-98
    Number of pages10
    JournalTechnological Forecasting and Social Change
    Volume121
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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    Disasters
    Recovery
    Traction
    Large scale systems
    Japan
    Resilience
    Linearity
    Disaster

    Cite this

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    Disaster resilience as a complex problem: why linearity is not applicable for long-term recovery. / BLACKMAN, Deborah; NAKANISHI, Hitomi; Benson, Angela.

    In: Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Vol. 121, 2017, p. 89-98.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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