Discussion: Misrepresentation of the USLE in 'Is sediment delivery a fallacy?'

Peter Kinnell

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The assertion that the application of the USLE to predicting soil losses within a catchment or watershed is not sound because the USLE provides an estimate of erosion that would be measured if the entire area were divided up into 22.1 m long plots, and the output from them all added together, is incorrect. The slope length factor was derived from data obtained using a wide range of plot lengths and included the 22.1 m length simply to force it to take on a value of 1.0 when the slope length is 22.1 m. The 22.1 to length has no physical significance but the USLE slope length factor has a physical basis when applied to planar and convex hillslopes. The use of sediment delivery ratios when the USLE is applied to concave areas attempts to correct for applying the USLE beyond its design criteria. It fails because, in using the sediment delivery ratios in the prediction sediment delivery, it is incorrectly assumed that sediment delivery ratios de not vary with the amount of sediment entering a zone of deposition.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1627-1629
    Number of pages3
    JournalEarth Surface Processes and Landforms
    Volume33
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Universal Soil Loss Equation
    sediment
    hillslope
    watershed
    catchment
    erosion
    prediction
    soil

    Cite this

    @article{ad8ec1f3517a4fb88829cc55ea189e67,
    title = "Discussion: Misrepresentation of the USLE in 'Is sediment delivery a fallacy?'",
    abstract = "The assertion that the application of the USLE to predicting soil losses within a catchment or watershed is not sound because the USLE provides an estimate of erosion that would be measured if the entire area were divided up into 22.1 m long plots, and the output from them all added together, is incorrect. The slope length factor was derived from data obtained using a wide range of plot lengths and included the 22.1 m length simply to force it to take on a value of 1.0 when the slope length is 22.1 m. The 22.1 to length has no physical significance but the USLE slope length factor has a physical basis when applied to planar and convex hillslopes. The use of sediment delivery ratios when the USLE is applied to concave areas attempts to correct for applying the USLE beyond its design criteria. It fails because, in using the sediment delivery ratios in the prediction sediment delivery, it is incorrectly assumed that sediment delivery ratios de not vary with the amount of sediment entering a zone of deposition.",
    keywords = "Hillslope soil losses, Sediment delivery ratios.",
    author = "Peter Kinnell",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1002/esp.1629",
    language = "English",
    volume = "33",
    pages = "1627--1629",
    journal = "Earth Surface Processes and Landforms",
    issn = "0169-555X",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
    number = "10",

    }

    Discussion: Misrepresentation of the USLE in 'Is sediment delivery a fallacy?'. / Kinnell, Peter.

    In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Vol. 33, No. 10, 2008, p. 1627-1629.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Discussion: Misrepresentation of the USLE in 'Is sediment delivery a fallacy?'

    AU - Kinnell, Peter

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - The assertion that the application of the USLE to predicting soil losses within a catchment or watershed is not sound because the USLE provides an estimate of erosion that would be measured if the entire area were divided up into 22.1 m long plots, and the output from them all added together, is incorrect. The slope length factor was derived from data obtained using a wide range of plot lengths and included the 22.1 m length simply to force it to take on a value of 1.0 when the slope length is 22.1 m. The 22.1 to length has no physical significance but the USLE slope length factor has a physical basis when applied to planar and convex hillslopes. The use of sediment delivery ratios when the USLE is applied to concave areas attempts to correct for applying the USLE beyond its design criteria. It fails because, in using the sediment delivery ratios in the prediction sediment delivery, it is incorrectly assumed that sediment delivery ratios de not vary with the amount of sediment entering a zone of deposition.

    AB - The assertion that the application of the USLE to predicting soil losses within a catchment or watershed is not sound because the USLE provides an estimate of erosion that would be measured if the entire area were divided up into 22.1 m long plots, and the output from them all added together, is incorrect. The slope length factor was derived from data obtained using a wide range of plot lengths and included the 22.1 m length simply to force it to take on a value of 1.0 when the slope length is 22.1 m. The 22.1 to length has no physical significance but the USLE slope length factor has a physical basis when applied to planar and convex hillslopes. The use of sediment delivery ratios when the USLE is applied to concave areas attempts to correct for applying the USLE beyond its design criteria. It fails because, in using the sediment delivery ratios in the prediction sediment delivery, it is incorrectly assumed that sediment delivery ratios de not vary with the amount of sediment entering a zone of deposition.

    KW - Hillslope soil losses

    KW - Sediment delivery ratios.

    U2 - 10.1002/esp.1629

    DO - 10.1002/esp.1629

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 33

    SP - 1627

    EP - 1629

    JO - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

    JF - Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

    SN - 0169-555X

    IS - 10

    ER -