Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain

Tribikram Thapa, Thomas Graven-Nielsen, Lucinda S. Chipchase, Siobhan M. Schabrun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms regulate synaptic plasticity in the human brain. Impaired homeostatic plasticity may contribute to maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: We examined homeostatic plasticity in fifty individuals with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and twenty-five pain-free controls. A single block (7-min) of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation ('single tDCS'), or two subsequent blocks (7-min and 5-min separated by 3-min rest; 'double tDCS'), were randomised across two experimental sessions to confirm an excitatory response to tDCS applied alone, and evaluate homeostatic plasticity, respectively. Corticomotor excitability was assessed in the corticomotor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded before and 0, 10, 20, and 30-min following each tDCS protocol. Results: Compared with baseline, MEP amplitudes increased at all time points in both groups following the single tDCS protocol (P < 0.003). Following the double tDCS protocol, MEP amplitudes decreased in pain-free controls at all time points compared with baseline (P < 0.01), and were unchanged in the cLBP group. Conclusion: These data indicate impaired homeostatic plasticity in the primary motor cortex of individuals with cLBP. Significance: Impaired homeostatic plasticity could explain maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in cLBP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1090-1096
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume129
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Low Back Pain
Homeostasis
Motor Evoked Potentials
Neuronal Plasticity
Musculoskeletal Pain
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Motor Cortex
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Chronic Pain
Muscles
Brain

Cite this

Thapa, Tribikram ; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas ; Chipchase, Lucinda S. ; Schabrun, Siobhan M. / Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2018 ; Vol. 129, No. 5. pp. 1090-1096.
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Thapa, T, Graven-Nielsen, T, Chipchase, LS & Schabrun, SM 2018, 'Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain', Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 129, no. 5, pp. 1090-1096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2018.01.060

Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain. / Thapa, Tribikram; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Chipchase, Lucinda S.; Schabrun, Siobhan M.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 129, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 1090-1096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain

AU - Thapa, Tribikram

AU - Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

AU - Chipchase, Lucinda S.

AU - Schabrun, Siobhan M.

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Objective: Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms regulate synaptic plasticity in the human brain. Impaired homeostatic plasticity may contribute to maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: We examined homeostatic plasticity in fifty individuals with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and twenty-five pain-free controls. A single block (7-min) of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation ('single tDCS'), or two subsequent blocks (7-min and 5-min separated by 3-min rest; 'double tDCS'), were randomised across two experimental sessions to confirm an excitatory response to tDCS applied alone, and evaluate homeostatic plasticity, respectively. Corticomotor excitability was assessed in the corticomotor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded before and 0, 10, 20, and 30-min following each tDCS protocol. Results: Compared with baseline, MEP amplitudes increased at all time points in both groups following the single tDCS protocol (P < 0.003). Following the double tDCS protocol, MEP amplitudes decreased in pain-free controls at all time points compared with baseline (P < 0.01), and were unchanged in the cLBP group. Conclusion: These data indicate impaired homeostatic plasticity in the primary motor cortex of individuals with cLBP. Significance: Impaired homeostatic plasticity could explain maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in cLBP.

AB - Objective: Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms regulate synaptic plasticity in the human brain. Impaired homeostatic plasticity may contribute to maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods: We examined homeostatic plasticity in fifty individuals with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and twenty-five pain-free controls. A single block (7-min) of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation ('single tDCS'), or two subsequent blocks (7-min and 5-min separated by 3-min rest; 'double tDCS'), were randomised across two experimental sessions to confirm an excitatory response to tDCS applied alone, and evaluate homeostatic plasticity, respectively. Corticomotor excitability was assessed in the corticomotor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded before and 0, 10, 20, and 30-min following each tDCS protocol. Results: Compared with baseline, MEP amplitudes increased at all time points in both groups following the single tDCS protocol (P < 0.003). Following the double tDCS protocol, MEP amplitudes decreased in pain-free controls at all time points compared with baseline (P < 0.01), and were unchanged in the cLBP group. Conclusion: These data indicate impaired homeostatic plasticity in the primary motor cortex of individuals with cLBP. Significance: Impaired homeostatic plasticity could explain maladaptive synaptic plasticity and symptom persistence in cLBP.

KW - Chronic low back pain

KW - Homeostatic plasticity

KW - Human

KW - Musculoskeletal pain

KW - Transcranial magnetic stimulation

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DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.01.060

M3 - Article

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JF - Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology - Electromyography and Motor Control

SN - 1388-2457

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ER -