Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories

Johann D. Bell, Valerie Allain, Edward H. Allison, Serge Andréfouët, Neil L. Andrew, Michael J. Batty, Michel Blanc, Jeffrey M. Dambacher, John Hampton, Quentin Hanich, Shelton Harley, Anne Lorrain, Michael McCoy, Nicholas McTurk, Simon Nicol, Graham Pilling, David Point, Michael K. Sharp, Paula Vivili, Peter Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The large tuna resources of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are delivering great economic benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) through sale of licences to distant water fishing nations and employment in fish processing. However, tuna needs to contribute to Pacific Island societies in another important way-by increasing local access to the fish required for good nutrition to help combat the world's highest levels of diabetes and obesity. Analyses reported here demonstrate that coastal fisheries in 16 of the 22 PICTs will not provide the fish recommended for good nutrition of growing Pacific Island populations, and that by 2020 tuna will need to supply 12% of the fish required by PICTs for food security, increasing to 25% by 2035. In relative terms, the percentages of the region's tuna catch that will be needed in 2020 and 2035 to fill the gap in domestic fish supply are small, i.e., 2.1% and 5.9% of the average present-day industrial catch, respectively. Interventions based on expanding the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to assist small-scale fishers catch tuna, distributing small tuna and bycatch offloaded by industrial fleets at regional ports, and improving access to canned tuna for inland populations, promise to increase access to fish for sustaining the health of the region's growing populations. The actions, research and policies required to implement these interventions effectively, and the investments needed to maintain the stocks underpinning the considerable socio-economic benefits that flow from tuna, are described.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-591
Number of pages8
JournalMarine Policy
Volume51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pacific Ocean Islands
tuna
food security
public health
food
nutrition
fish
fish processing
sale
fishery
license
action research
chronic illness
economics
fish aggregating device
supply
coastal fishery
canned fish
water
obesity

Cite this

Bell, J. D., Allain, V., Allison, E. H., Andréfouët, S., Andrew, N. L., Batty, M. J., ... Williams, P. (2015). Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories. Marine Policy, 51, 584-591. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2014.10.005
Bell, Johann D. ; Allain, Valerie ; Allison, Edward H. ; Andréfouët, Serge ; Andrew, Neil L. ; Batty, Michael J. ; Blanc, Michel ; Dambacher, Jeffrey M. ; Hampton, John ; Hanich, Quentin ; Harley, Shelton ; Lorrain, Anne ; McCoy, Michael ; McTurk, Nicholas ; Nicol, Simon ; Pilling, Graham ; Point, David ; Sharp, Michael K. ; Vivili, Paula ; Williams, Peter. / Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories. In: Marine Policy. 2015 ; Vol. 51. pp. 584-591.
@article{de784ead62734b1f978ca25ce6c9d521,
title = "Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories",
abstract = "The large tuna resources of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are delivering great economic benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) through sale of licences to distant water fishing nations and employment in fish processing. However, tuna needs to contribute to Pacific Island societies in another important way-by increasing local access to the fish required for good nutrition to help combat the world's highest levels of diabetes and obesity. Analyses reported here demonstrate that coastal fisheries in 16 of the 22 PICTs will not provide the fish recommended for good nutrition of growing Pacific Island populations, and that by 2020 tuna will need to supply 12{\%} of the fish required by PICTs for food security, increasing to 25{\%} by 2035. In relative terms, the percentages of the region's tuna catch that will be needed in 2020 and 2035 to fill the gap in domestic fish supply are small, i.e., 2.1{\%} and 5.9{\%} of the average present-day industrial catch, respectively. Interventions based on expanding the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to assist small-scale fishers catch tuna, distributing small tuna and bycatch offloaded by industrial fleets at regional ports, and improving access to canned tuna for inland populations, promise to increase access to fish for sustaining the health of the region's growing populations. The actions, research and policies required to implement these interventions effectively, and the investments needed to maintain the stocks underpinning the considerable socio-economic benefits that flow from tuna, are described.",
keywords = "Food security, Non-communicable diseases, Pacific Islands, Population growth, Tuna",
author = "Bell, {Johann D.} and Valerie Allain and Allison, {Edward H.} and Serge Andr{\'e}fou{\"e}t and Andrew, {Neil L.} and Batty, {Michael J.} and Michel Blanc and Dambacher, {Jeffrey M.} and John Hampton and Quentin Hanich and Shelton Harley and Anne Lorrain and Michael McCoy and Nicholas McTurk and Simon Nicol and Graham Pilling and David Point and Sharp, {Michael K.} and Paula Vivili and Peter Williams",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.marpol.2014.10.005",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "584--591",
journal = "Marine Policy",
issn = "0308-597X",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Bell, JD, Allain, V, Allison, EH, Andréfouët, S, Andrew, NL, Batty, MJ, Blanc, M, Dambacher, JM, Hampton, J, Hanich, Q, Harley, S, Lorrain, A, McCoy, M, McTurk, N, Nicol, S, Pilling, G, Point, D, Sharp, MK, Vivili, P & Williams, P 2015, 'Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories', Marine Policy, vol. 51, pp. 584-591. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2014.10.005

Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories. / Bell, Johann D.; Allain, Valerie; Allison, Edward H.; Andréfouët, Serge; Andrew, Neil L.; Batty, Michael J.; Blanc, Michel; Dambacher, Jeffrey M.; Hampton, John; Hanich, Quentin; Harley, Shelton; Lorrain, Anne; McCoy, Michael; McTurk, Nicholas; Nicol, Simon; Pilling, Graham; Point, David; Sharp, Michael K.; Vivili, Paula; Williams, Peter.

In: Marine Policy, Vol. 51, 01.2015, p. 584-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diversifying the use of tuna to improve food security and public health in Pacific Island countries and territories

AU - Bell, Johann D.

AU - Allain, Valerie

AU - Allison, Edward H.

AU - Andréfouët, Serge

AU - Andrew, Neil L.

AU - Batty, Michael J.

AU - Blanc, Michel

AU - Dambacher, Jeffrey M.

AU - Hampton, John

AU - Hanich, Quentin

AU - Harley, Shelton

AU - Lorrain, Anne

AU - McCoy, Michael

AU - McTurk, Nicholas

AU - Nicol, Simon

AU - Pilling, Graham

AU - Point, David

AU - Sharp, Michael K.

AU - Vivili, Paula

AU - Williams, Peter

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - The large tuna resources of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are delivering great economic benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) through sale of licences to distant water fishing nations and employment in fish processing. However, tuna needs to contribute to Pacific Island societies in another important way-by increasing local access to the fish required for good nutrition to help combat the world's highest levels of diabetes and obesity. Analyses reported here demonstrate that coastal fisheries in 16 of the 22 PICTs will not provide the fish recommended for good nutrition of growing Pacific Island populations, and that by 2020 tuna will need to supply 12% of the fish required by PICTs for food security, increasing to 25% by 2035. In relative terms, the percentages of the region's tuna catch that will be needed in 2020 and 2035 to fill the gap in domestic fish supply are small, i.e., 2.1% and 5.9% of the average present-day industrial catch, respectively. Interventions based on expanding the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to assist small-scale fishers catch tuna, distributing small tuna and bycatch offloaded by industrial fleets at regional ports, and improving access to canned tuna for inland populations, promise to increase access to fish for sustaining the health of the region's growing populations. The actions, research and policies required to implement these interventions effectively, and the investments needed to maintain the stocks underpinning the considerable socio-economic benefits that flow from tuna, are described.

AB - The large tuna resources of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are delivering great economic benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) through sale of licences to distant water fishing nations and employment in fish processing. However, tuna needs to contribute to Pacific Island societies in another important way-by increasing local access to the fish required for good nutrition to help combat the world's highest levels of diabetes and obesity. Analyses reported here demonstrate that coastal fisheries in 16 of the 22 PICTs will not provide the fish recommended for good nutrition of growing Pacific Island populations, and that by 2020 tuna will need to supply 12% of the fish required by PICTs for food security, increasing to 25% by 2035. In relative terms, the percentages of the region's tuna catch that will be needed in 2020 and 2035 to fill the gap in domestic fish supply are small, i.e., 2.1% and 5.9% of the average present-day industrial catch, respectively. Interventions based on expanding the use of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to assist small-scale fishers catch tuna, distributing small tuna and bycatch offloaded by industrial fleets at regional ports, and improving access to canned tuna for inland populations, promise to increase access to fish for sustaining the health of the region's growing populations. The actions, research and policies required to implement these interventions effectively, and the investments needed to maintain the stocks underpinning the considerable socio-economic benefits that flow from tuna, are described.

KW - Food security

KW - Non-communicable diseases

KW - Pacific Islands

KW - Population growth

KW - Tuna

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84909606160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.marpol.2014.10.005

DO - 10.1016/j.marpol.2014.10.005

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 584

EP - 591

JO - Marine Policy

JF - Marine Policy

SN - 0308-597X

ER -