Does Monitoring Performance Eliminate the Ego-depletion Phenomenon and Influence Perception of Time?

Alexandra Voce, Stephen MOSTON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated whether monitoring performance against an objective measure eliminated ego-depletion and enhanced the accuracy of one's temporal perception. Two independent variables, depletion level and monitoring status, were manipulated in 83 undergraduates (71% female, median age = 21.2 years), who were then measured for persistence on a series of anagram puzzles (first dependant variable) and subjective time perception estimates (second dependant variable). While depleted participants in the nonmonitoring condition exhibited significantly less persistence than those in the performance-monitoring or low-depleted conditions, no differences in time perception scores were detected among the four groups. It appears monitoring behavior against an objective measure is a robust tool to improve self-control ability in depleted individuals; however, this effect is unrelated to perception of time.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-46
Number of pages15
JournalSelf and Identity
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Voce, Alexandra ; MOSTON, Stephen. / Does Monitoring Performance Eliminate the Ego-depletion Phenomenon and Influence Perception of Time?. In: Self and Identity. 2016 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 32-46.
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Does Monitoring Performance Eliminate the Ego-depletion Phenomenon and Influence Perception of Time? / Voce, Alexandra; MOSTON, Stephen.

In: Self and Identity, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2016, p. 32-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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