Does stride length play a role in cricket fast bowling performance outcomes? An observational, cross-sectional study

Wayne SPRATFORD, Claire Kenneally-Dabrowski, Sean Byrne, Amy Hicks, Marc Portus

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of delivery stride length on the performance outcomes of ball release speed, accuracy and ball release height within a large cohort of elite male cricket fast bowlers. Data for this observational, cross-sectional study were collected from national under 19, senior state and international level players over a four-year period. No statistically significant differences were found between the three stride length groups (short, medium and long). However, a functional difference in accuracy was evident between short and long stride length groups, with the long stride length group being less accurate (effect size (ES) = 0.8; ES confidence interval (CI) = 0.2–1.4). Therefore, it can be concluded, given the results of the current study and previous injury-related research, that in no way is it advantageous for bowlers to have a stride length that exceeds the recommended 75–85% of standing height
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)655-661
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Science and Coaching
    Volume11
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    title = "Does stride length play a role in cricket fast bowling performance outcomes? An observational, cross-sectional study",
    abstract = "The aim of this study was to determine the effect of delivery stride length on the performance outcomes of ball release speed, accuracy and ball release height within a large cohort of elite male cricket fast bowlers. Data for this observational, cross-sectional study were collected from national under 19, senior state and international level players over a four-year period. No statistically significant differences were found between the three stride length groups (short, medium and long). However, a functional difference in accuracy was evident between short and long stride length groups, with the long stride length group being less accurate (effect size (ES) = 0.8; ES confidence interval (CI) = 0.2–1.4). Therefore, it can be concluded, given the results of the current study and previous injury-related research, that in no way is it advantageous for bowlers to have a stride length that exceeds the recommended 75–85{\%} of standing height",
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    Does stride length play a role in cricket fast bowling performance outcomes? An observational, cross-sectional study. / SPRATFORD, Wayne; Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire; Byrne, Sean; Hicks, Amy; Portus, Marc.

    In: International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, Vol. 11, No. 5, 2016, p. 655-661.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Does stride length play a role in cricket fast bowling performance outcomes? An observational, cross-sectional study

    AU - SPRATFORD, Wayne

    AU - Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire

    AU - Byrne, Sean

    AU - Hicks, Amy

    AU - Portus, Marc

    PY - 2016

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    AB - The aim of this study was to determine the effect of delivery stride length on the performance outcomes of ball release speed, accuracy and ball release height within a large cohort of elite male cricket fast bowlers. Data for this observational, cross-sectional study were collected from national under 19, senior state and international level players over a four-year period. No statistically significant differences were found between the three stride length groups (short, medium and long). However, a functional difference in accuracy was evident between short and long stride length groups, with the long stride length group being less accurate (effect size (ES) = 0.8; ES confidence interval (CI) = 0.2–1.4). Therefore, it can be concluded, given the results of the current study and previous injury-related research, that in no way is it advantageous for bowlers to have a stride length that exceeds the recommended 75–85% of standing height

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