Does Wearing Textured Insoles during Non-class Time Improve Proprioception in Professional Dancers?

Nili Steinberg, Oren Tirosh, Roger Adams, Janet Karin, Gordon WADDINGTON

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study sought to determine whether textured insoles inserted in the sports shoes of young dancers improved their inversion and eversion ankle movement discrimination. 26 ballet dancers (14 female, 12 male) from the Australian Ballet School, ages 14-19 years, were divided into 2 groups according to sex and class levels. During the first 4 weeks, the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their sports shoes during non-class periods, and the second intervention group (GRP2) followed standard practice. In the next 4 weeks, GRP2 was asked to wear the textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. Participants were tested pre-intervention, after 4 weeks, and at 8 weeks for both inversion and eversion ankle discrimination. In both inversion and eversion testing positions, interaction was found between the 2 groups and the 3 testing times (p
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1093-1099
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
    Volume36
    Issue number13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Proprioception
    Shoes
    Ankle
    Sports

    Cite this

    Steinberg, Nili ; Tirosh, Oren ; Adams, Roger ; Karin, Janet ; WADDINGTON, Gordon. / Does Wearing Textured Insoles during Non-class Time Improve Proprioception in Professional Dancers?. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 13. pp. 1093-1099.
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    abstract = "This study sought to determine whether textured insoles inserted in the sports shoes of young dancers improved their inversion and eversion ankle movement discrimination. 26 ballet dancers (14 female, 12 male) from the Australian Ballet School, ages 14-19 years, were divided into 2 groups according to sex and class levels. During the first 4 weeks, the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their sports shoes during non-class periods, and the second intervention group (GRP2) followed standard practice. In the next 4 weeks, GRP2 was asked to wear the textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. Participants were tested pre-intervention, after 4 weeks, and at 8 weeks for both inversion and eversion ankle discrimination. In both inversion and eversion testing positions, interaction was found between the 2 groups and the 3 testing times (p",
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    Does Wearing Textured Insoles during Non-class Time Improve Proprioception in Professional Dancers? / Steinberg, Nili; Tirosh, Oren; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; WADDINGTON, Gordon.

    In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 13, 2015, p. 1093-1099.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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