Don’t rock the boat

The moderating role of gender in the relationship between workplace incivility and work withdrawal

Natasha M. Loi, Jennifer M.I. Loh, Donald W. Hine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: There is a vast array of literature which investigates the concept and impact of workplace incivility. Evidence suggests that compared to male employees, female employees tend to experience and put up more with workplace incivility. However, there is limited research on how this affects female employee’s willingness to complete work-related tasks. The purpose of this paper is to set out to examine whether gender moderates the role between tolerance for workplace incivility and those behaviours characterised by work withdrawal.

Design/methodology/approach: In total, 317 employees from a range of business industries and governmental agencies completed a quantitative survey of measures relating to their work withdrawal behaviour and their perception of their workplaces’ tolerance for uncivil behaviours.

Findings: Results revealed that when females perceived high levels of tolerance for workplace incivility, they decreased their work withdrawal behaviour. No relationship between tolerance for workplace incivility and work withdrawal was found for males.

Research limitations/implications: The homogeneity of the sample, that is, the sample comprised predominantly of white-collar, White Australian workers.

Practical implications: Improve managers and organisations’ knowledge and understanding about deviant workplace behaviours – especially between male and female employees.

Originality/value: The paper adds to the work in the workplace incivility, diversity-gender and equity research area. Specifically, it highlights how male and female employees react when they perceive that their workplace tolerates deviant behaviours. This knowledge will inform managers and their organisations of a more effective way of managing conflict.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-186
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Management Development
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Work place
Incivility
Work Place
Employees
Tolerance
Managers
Knowledge organization
Industry
Willingness
Equity
Design methodology
Deviant behavior
Workers
Gender diversity
Homogeneity
Complete Work
Methodology
Originality

Cite this

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Don’t rock the boat : The moderating role of gender in the relationship between workplace incivility and work withdrawal. / Loi, Natasha M.; Loh, Jennifer M.I.; Hine, Donald W.

In: Journal of Management Development, Vol. 34, No. 2, 02.03.2015, p. 169-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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