Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students

Amanda M. George, Byron L. Zamboanga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction and Aims: Most drinking game (DG) research among university students has been conducted among USA college samples. The extent to which demographics and game type (e.g. team and sculling games) are linked to DG behaviours/consequences among non-USA students is not well understood. As such, the current study investigated characteristics of DG participation (and associated outcomes) among a sample of Australian university students. Methods: University students (N =252; aged 18-24years; 67% female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year completed an online survey. Measures included demographics, DG behaviours (lifetime, frequency and consumption) and gaming-specific consequences. Results: Most of the students reported lifetime DG participation (85%). Among those who played a DG in the prior 6months (69%), most had experienced a negative gaming-specific consequence. While team games were the most popular DG played, regression analysis demonstrated that participation in games which encouraged consumption (e.g. sculling) were associated with increased alcohol consumption during play. In addition to being older, playing DGs more frequently, and consuming more alcohol while playing, participation in both consumption and dice games (e.g. 7-11, doubles) predicted more negative gaming-specific consequences. Discussion and Conclusions: DG participation is common among Australian university students, as it is in other parts of the world. The importance of game type is clear, particularly the risk of consumption games. Findings could help inform interventions to reduce participation in consumption games and identify students who might be especially at-risk for experiencing negative DG consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)599-606
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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Drinking
Students
participation
university
student
Drinking Behavior
alcohol
Alcohols
Demography
online survey
alcohol consumption
Alcohol Drinking
regression analysis
Regression Analysis
Research

Cite this

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title = "Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students",
abstract = "Introduction and Aims: Most drinking game (DG) research among university students has been conducted among USA college samples. The extent to which demographics and game type (e.g. team and sculling games) are linked to DG behaviours/consequences among non-USA students is not well understood. As such, the current study investigated characteristics of DG participation (and associated outcomes) among a sample of Australian university students. Methods: University students (N =252; aged 18-24years; 67{\%} female) who had consumed alcohol in the prior year completed an online survey. Measures included demographics, DG behaviours (lifetime, frequency and consumption) and gaming-specific consequences. Results: Most of the students reported lifetime DG participation (85{\%}). Among those who played a DG in the prior 6months (69{\%}), most had experienced a negative gaming-specific consequence. While team games were the most popular DG played, regression analysis demonstrated that participation in games which encouraged consumption (e.g. sculling) were associated with increased alcohol consumption during play. In addition to being older, playing DGs more frequently, and consuming more alcohol while playing, participation in both consumption and dice games (e.g. 7-11, doubles) predicted more negative gaming-specific consequences. Discussion and Conclusions: DG participation is common among Australian university students, as it is in other parts of the world. The importance of game type is clear, particularly the risk of consumption games. Findings could help inform interventions to reduce participation in consumption games and identify students who might be especially at-risk for experiencing negative DG consequences.",
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Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students. / George, Amanda M.; Zamboanga, Byron L.

In: Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.07.2018, p. 599-606.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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