E-Examinations and the Student Experience Regarding Appropriateness of Assessment and Course Quality in Science and Medical Science

Ananthan Ambikairajah, Christopher C. Tisdell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The interest in, and use of, computers and software for assessment is reported to be increasingly popular via electronic examinations (e-exams). We deepen our understanding of the design, reception, and effectiveness of e-exams for history and philosophy of science modules, undertaken by first-year advanced science and medical science students at university. We employ a quasi-experimental research design approach to examine our implementation of e-exams on reported student satisfaction regarding the suitability of the information provided about the assessment requirements, appropriateness of the assessment methods, and overall quality of the associated courses. We report statistically significant increases in student satisfaction regarding the suitability and appropriateness of the assessment methods or requirements. The outcomes of this research highlight new avenues for educators to explore including (a) the innovative use of associated software (Maple TA™) for e-exams and (b) the implications that e-exams can have on the student experience in the context of medium-stakes testing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-478
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Educational Technology Systems
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

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