Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in stressed and sedentary adults

A randomised controlled trial

Zoe L. Hewett, Kate L. Pumpa, Caroline A. Smith, Paul P. Fahey, Birinder S. Cheema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of Bikram yoga on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in sedentary, stressed adults. Design: 16 week, parallel-arm, randomised controlled trial with flexible dosing. Methods: Physically inactive, stressed adults (37.2 ± 10.8 years) were randomised to Bikram yoga (three to five classes per week) or control (no treatment) group for 16 weeks. Outcome measures, collected via self-report, included perceived stress, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, midpoint and completion. Results: Individuals were randomised to the experimental (n = 29) or control group (n = 34). Average attendance in the experimental group was 27 ± 18 classes. Repeated measure analyses of variance (intention-to-treat) demonstrated significantly improved perceived stress (p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.109), general self-efficacy (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.056), and the general health (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.058) and energy/fatigue (p = 0.019, partial η2 = 0.066) domains of HRQoL in the experimental group versus the control group. Attendance was significantly associated with reductions in perceived stress, and an increase in several domains of HRQoL. Conclusions: 16 weeks of Bikram yoga significantly improved perceived stress, general self-efficacy and HRQoL in sedentary, stressed adults. Future research should consider ways to optimise adherence, and should investigate effects of Bikram yoga intervention in other populations at risk for stress-related illness. Trial registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493. Registered 04 July 2016. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12616000867493.aspx.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-357
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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Yoga
Self Efficacy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Control Groups
New Zealand
Self Report
Fatigue
Registries
Analysis of Variance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Clinical Trials
Health

Cite this

@article{70bb89c06f324345b9f50c34913a1bc2,
title = "Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in stressed and sedentary adults: A randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of Bikram yoga on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in sedentary, stressed adults. Design: 16 week, parallel-arm, randomised controlled trial with flexible dosing. Methods: Physically inactive, stressed adults (37.2 ± 10.8 years) were randomised to Bikram yoga (three to five classes per week) or control (no treatment) group for 16 weeks. Outcome measures, collected via self-report, included perceived stress, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, midpoint and completion. Results: Individuals were randomised to the experimental (n = 29) or control group (n = 34). Average attendance in the experimental group was 27 ± 18 classes. Repeated measure analyses of variance (intention-to-treat) demonstrated significantly improved perceived stress (p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.109), general self-efficacy (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.056), and the general health (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.058) and energy/fatigue (p = 0.019, partial η2 = 0.066) domains of HRQoL in the experimental group versus the control group. Attendance was significantly associated with reductions in perceived stress, and an increase in several domains of HRQoL. Conclusions: 16 weeks of Bikram yoga significantly improved perceived stress, general self-efficacy and HRQoL in sedentary, stressed adults. Future research should consider ways to optimise adherence, and should investigate effects of Bikram yoga intervention in other populations at risk for stress-related illness. Trial registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493. Registered 04 July 2016. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12616000867493.aspx.",
keywords = "Chronic disease, Hatha yoga, Inactivity, Psychological health, Stress, Psychological/therapy, Self Efficacy, Humans, Middle Aged, Male, Young Adult, Quality of Life, Adult, Female, Yoga, Sedentary Behavior",
author = "Hewett, {Zoe L.} and Pumpa, {Kate L.} and Smith, {Caroline A.} and Fahey, {Paul P.} and Cheema, {Birinder S.}",
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Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in stressed and sedentary adults : A randomised controlled trial. / Hewett, Zoe L.; Pumpa, Kate L.; Smith, Caroline A.; Fahey, Paul P.; Cheema, Birinder S.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 21, No. 4, 04.2018, p. 352-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in stressed and sedentary adults

T2 - A randomised controlled trial

AU - Hewett, Zoe L.

AU - Pumpa, Kate L.

AU - Smith, Caroline A.

AU - Fahey, Paul P.

AU - Cheema, Birinder S.

N1 - Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of Bikram yoga on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in sedentary, stressed adults. Design: 16 week, parallel-arm, randomised controlled trial with flexible dosing. Methods: Physically inactive, stressed adults (37.2 ± 10.8 years) were randomised to Bikram yoga (three to five classes per week) or control (no treatment) group for 16 weeks. Outcome measures, collected via self-report, included perceived stress, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, midpoint and completion. Results: Individuals were randomised to the experimental (n = 29) or control group (n = 34). Average attendance in the experimental group was 27 ± 18 classes. Repeated measure analyses of variance (intention-to-treat) demonstrated significantly improved perceived stress (p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.109), general self-efficacy (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.056), and the general health (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.058) and energy/fatigue (p = 0.019, partial η2 = 0.066) domains of HRQoL in the experimental group versus the control group. Attendance was significantly associated with reductions in perceived stress, and an increase in several domains of HRQoL. Conclusions: 16 weeks of Bikram yoga significantly improved perceived stress, general self-efficacy and HRQoL in sedentary, stressed adults. Future research should consider ways to optimise adherence, and should investigate effects of Bikram yoga intervention in other populations at risk for stress-related illness. Trial registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493. Registered 04 July 2016. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12616000867493.aspx.

AB - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of Bikram yoga on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in sedentary, stressed adults. Design: 16 week, parallel-arm, randomised controlled trial with flexible dosing. Methods: Physically inactive, stressed adults (37.2 ± 10.8 years) were randomised to Bikram yoga (three to five classes per week) or control (no treatment) group for 16 weeks. Outcome measures, collected via self-report, included perceived stress, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, midpoint and completion. Results: Individuals were randomised to the experimental (n = 29) or control group (n = 34). Average attendance in the experimental group was 27 ± 18 classes. Repeated measure analyses of variance (intention-to-treat) demonstrated significantly improved perceived stress (p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.109), general self-efficacy (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.056), and the general health (p = 0.034, partial η2 = 0.058) and energy/fatigue (p = 0.019, partial η2 = 0.066) domains of HRQoL in the experimental group versus the control group. Attendance was significantly associated with reductions in perceived stress, and an increase in several domains of HRQoL. Conclusions: 16 weeks of Bikram yoga significantly improved perceived stress, general self-efficacy and HRQoL in sedentary, stressed adults. Future research should consider ways to optimise adherence, and should investigate effects of Bikram yoga intervention in other populations at risk for stress-related illness. Trial registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493. Registered 04 July 2016. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12616000867493.aspx.

KW - Chronic disease

KW - Hatha yoga

KW - Inactivity

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KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

KW - Young Adult

KW - Quality of Life

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Yoga

KW - Sedentary Behavior

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JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

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