Effect of audit quality and accounting and finance backgrounds of audit committee members on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing

Md Khokan Bepari, Abu MOLLIK

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of audit quality on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Differences in the compliance among the clients of Big-4 auditors and between the clients of Big-4 and non-Big-4 auditors are examined. This study also examines the effect of audit committee (AC) members' accounting and finance backgrounds on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Design/methodology/approach - Different univariate tests, multivariate regressions and fixed effect panel regressions have been used to examine the hypotheses. The sample includes 911 firm-year observations for the period of 2006-2009. Findings - A statistically significant difference in compliance levels has been found between the clients of Big-4 and non-Big-4 auditors. The compliance levels of the clients of Big-4 auditors have also been found to be significantly different. The findings also suggest that AC members' accounting and finance backgrounds are positively associated with firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Research limitations/implications - The single country context and the single standard context limit the generalizability of the findings. Practical implications - The findings of this study have important implications for researches in accounting, finance and corporate governance that usually consider Big-4 auditors vs non-Big-4 auditors as a proxy for audit quality. The results also reinforce the importance of developing institutional mechanisms such as high-quality auditing or corporate governance (AC members' expertise) to encourage firms' compliance with IFRS. Originality/value - Firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing is not essentially the same for the clients of all Big-4 auditors in Australia, suggesting that the quality of services provided by Big-4 auditors significantly differ from one another in enforcing their clients to compliance with IFRS. The lax enforcement on the part of auditors and the regulatory inaction in this regard may point to teething difficulties and systematic deficiencies in the move towards the impairment regime and fair value accounting. The findings also bear an important message for the move towards the harmonization of accounting practices.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)196-220
    Number of pages25
    JournalJournal of Applied Accounting Research
    Volume16
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    Audit quality
    Testing
    Audit committee
    Impairment
    International Financial Reporting Standards
    Finance
    Auditors
    Goodwill
    Big 4
    Disclosure
    Firm value
    Corporate governance
    Multivariate regression
    Harmonization
    Corporate finance and governance
    Design methodology
    Enforcement
    Quality of service
    Fixed effects
    Expertise

    Cite this

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    title = "Effect of audit quality and accounting and finance backgrounds of audit committee members on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing",
    abstract = "Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of audit quality on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Differences in the compliance among the clients of Big-4 auditors and between the clients of Big-4 and non-Big-4 auditors are examined. This study also examines the effect of audit committee (AC) members' accounting and finance backgrounds on firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Design/methodology/approach - Different univariate tests, multivariate regressions and fixed effect panel regressions have been used to examine the hypotheses. The sample includes 911 firm-year observations for the period of 2006-2009. Findings - A statistically significant difference in compliance levels has been found between the clients of Big-4 and non-Big-4 auditors. The compliance levels of the clients of Big-4 auditors have also been found to be significantly different. The findings also suggest that AC members' accounting and finance backgrounds are positively associated with firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing and disclosure. Research limitations/implications - The single country context and the single standard context limit the generalizability of the findings. Practical implications - The findings of this study have important implications for researches in accounting, finance and corporate governance that usually consider Big-4 auditors vs non-Big-4 auditors as a proxy for audit quality. The results also reinforce the importance of developing institutional mechanisms such as high-quality auditing or corporate governance (AC members' expertise) to encourage firms' compliance with IFRS. Originality/value - Firms' compliance with IFRS for goodwill impairment testing is not essentially the same for the clients of all Big-4 auditors in Australia, suggesting that the quality of services provided by Big-4 auditors significantly differ from one another in enforcing their clients to compliance with IFRS. The lax enforcement on the part of auditors and the regulatory inaction in this regard may point to teething difficulties and systematic deficiencies in the move towards the impairment regime and fair value accounting. The findings also bear an important message for the move towards the harmonization of accounting practices.",
    keywords = "Audit committee members' accounting and finance background, Audit quality, Big-4 auditors, Goodwill impairment, IFRS36/AASB-136",
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