Effect of different simulated altitudes on repeat-sprint performance in team-sport athletes

Paul S R Goods, Brian T. Dawson, Grant J. Landers, Christopher J. Gore, Peter Peeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the impact of 3 heights of simulated altitude exposure on repeat-sprint performance in teamsport athletes. Methods: Ten trained male team-sport athletes completed 3 sets of repeated sprints (9 × 4 s) on a nonmotorized treadmill at sea level and at simulated altitudes of 2000, 3000, and 4000 m. Participants completed 4 trials in a random order over 4 wk, with mean power output (MPO), peak power output (PPO), blood lactate concentration (Bla), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) recorded after each set. Results: Each increase in simulated altitude corresponded with a significant decrease in SaO2. Total work across all sets was highest at sea level and correspondingly lower at each successive altitude (P < .05; sea level < 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). In the first set, MPO was reduced only at 4000 m, but for subsequent sets, decreases in MPO were observed at all altitudes (P < .05; 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). PPO was maintained in all sets except for set 3 at 4000 m (P < .05; vs sea level and 2000 m). BLa levels were highest at 4000 m and significantly greater (P < .05) than at sea level after all sets. Conclusions: These results suggest that "higher may not be better," as a simulated altitude of 4000 m may potentially blunt absolute training quality. Therefore, it is recommended that a moderate simulated altitude (2000-3000 m) be employed when implementing intermittent hypoxic repeat-sprint training for team-sport athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)857-862
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Athletes
Sports
Oceans and Seas
Lactic Acid
Oxygen

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Goods, Paul S R ; Dawson, Brian T. ; Landers, Grant J. ; Gore, Christopher J. ; Peeling, Peter. / Effect of different simulated altitudes on repeat-sprint performance in team-sport athletes. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 5. pp. 857-862.
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Effect of different simulated altitudes on repeat-sprint performance in team-sport athletes. / Goods, Paul S R; Dawson, Brian T.; Landers, Grant J.; Gore, Christopher J.; Peeling, Peter.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 9, No. 5, 2014, p. 857-862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Purpose: This study aimed to assess the impact of 3 heights of simulated altitude exposure on repeat-sprint performance in teamsport athletes. Methods: Ten trained male team-sport athletes completed 3 sets of repeated sprints (9 × 4 s) on a nonmotorized treadmill at sea level and at simulated altitudes of 2000, 3000, and 4000 m. Participants completed 4 trials in a random order over 4 wk, with mean power output (MPO), peak power output (PPO), blood lactate concentration (Bla), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) recorded after each set. Results: Each increase in simulated altitude corresponded with a significant decrease in SaO2. Total work across all sets was highest at sea level and correspondingly lower at each successive altitude (P < .05; sea level < 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). In the first set, MPO was reduced only at 4000 m, but for subsequent sets, decreases in MPO were observed at all altitudes (P < .05; 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). PPO was maintained in all sets except for set 3 at 4000 m (P < .05; vs sea level and 2000 m). BLa levels were highest at 4000 m and significantly greater (P < .05) than at sea level after all sets. Conclusions: These results suggest that "higher may not be better," as a simulated altitude of 4000 m may potentially blunt absolute training quality. Therefore, it is recommended that a moderate simulated altitude (2000-3000 m) be employed when implementing intermittent hypoxic repeat-sprint training for team-sport athletes.

AB - Purpose: This study aimed to assess the impact of 3 heights of simulated altitude exposure on repeat-sprint performance in teamsport athletes. Methods: Ten trained male team-sport athletes completed 3 sets of repeated sprints (9 × 4 s) on a nonmotorized treadmill at sea level and at simulated altitudes of 2000, 3000, and 4000 m. Participants completed 4 trials in a random order over 4 wk, with mean power output (MPO), peak power output (PPO), blood lactate concentration (Bla), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) recorded after each set. Results: Each increase in simulated altitude corresponded with a significant decrease in SaO2. Total work across all sets was highest at sea level and correspondingly lower at each successive altitude (P < .05; sea level < 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). In the first set, MPO was reduced only at 4000 m, but for subsequent sets, decreases in MPO were observed at all altitudes (P < .05; 2000 m < 3000 m < 4000 m). PPO was maintained in all sets except for set 3 at 4000 m (P < .05; vs sea level and 2000 m). BLa levels were highest at 4000 m and significantly greater (P < .05) than at sea level after all sets. Conclusions: These results suggest that "higher may not be better," as a simulated altitude of 4000 m may potentially blunt absolute training quality. Therefore, it is recommended that a moderate simulated altitude (2000-3000 m) be employed when implementing intermittent hypoxic repeat-sprint training for team-sport athletes.

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