Effect of exercise intensity on the postexercise sweating threshold

Glen P Kenny, Julien Periard, W Shane Journeay, Ronald J Sigal, Francis D Reardon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that the magnitude of the postexercise onset threshold for sweating is increased by the intensity of exercise was tested in eight subjects. Esophageal temperature was monitored as an index of core temperature while sweat rate was measured by using a ventilated capsule placed on the upper back. Subjects remained seated resting for 15 min (no exercise) or performed 15 min of treadmill running at either 55, 70, or 85% of peak oxygen consumption (V(o2 peak)) followed by a 20-min seated recovery. Subjects then donned a liquid-conditioned suit used to regulate mean skin temperature. The suit was first perfused with 20 degrees C water to control and stabilize skin and core temperature before whole body heating. Subsequently, the skin was heated ( approximately 4.0 degrees C/h) until sweating occurred. Exercise resulted in an increase in the onset threshold for sweating of 0.11 +/- 0.02, 0.23 +/- 0.01, and 0.33 +/- 0.02 degrees C above that measured for the no-exercise resting values (P < 0.05) for the 55, 70, and 85% of V(o2 peak) exercise conditions, respectively. We did note that there was a greater postexercise hypotension as a function of exercise intensity as measured at the end of the 20-min exercise recovery. Thus it is plausible that the increase in postexercise threshold may be related to postexercise hypotension. It is concluded that the sweating response during upright recovery is significantly modified by exercise intensity and may likely be influenced by the nonthermal baroreceptor reflex adjustments postexercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2355-60
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Sweating
Post-Exercise Hypotension
Skin Temperature
Temperature
Baroreflex
Sweat
Oxygen Consumption
Heating
Capsules
Skin
Water

Cite this

Kenny, Glen P ; Periard, Julien ; Journeay, W Shane ; Sigal, Ronald J ; Reardon, Francis D. / Effect of exercise intensity on the postexercise sweating threshold. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2003 ; Vol. 95, No. 6. pp. 2355-60.
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Effect of exercise intensity on the postexercise sweating threshold. / Kenny, Glen P; Periard, Julien; Journeay, W Shane; Sigal, Ronald J; Reardon, Francis D.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 95, No. 6, 12.2003, p. 2355-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of exercise intensity on the postexercise sweating threshold

AU - Kenny, Glen P

AU - Periard, Julien

AU - Journeay, W Shane

AU - Sigal, Ronald J

AU - Reardon, Francis D

PY - 2003/12

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N2 - The hypothesis that the magnitude of the postexercise onset threshold for sweating is increased by the intensity of exercise was tested in eight subjects. Esophageal temperature was monitored as an index of core temperature while sweat rate was measured by using a ventilated capsule placed on the upper back. Subjects remained seated resting for 15 min (no exercise) or performed 15 min of treadmill running at either 55, 70, or 85% of peak oxygen consumption (V(o2 peak)) followed by a 20-min seated recovery. Subjects then donned a liquid-conditioned suit used to regulate mean skin temperature. The suit was first perfused with 20 degrees C water to control and stabilize skin and core temperature before whole body heating. Subsequently, the skin was heated ( approximately 4.0 degrees C/h) until sweating occurred. Exercise resulted in an increase in the onset threshold for sweating of 0.11 +/- 0.02, 0.23 +/- 0.01, and 0.33 +/- 0.02 degrees C above that measured for the no-exercise resting values (P < 0.05) for the 55, 70, and 85% of V(o2 peak) exercise conditions, respectively. We did note that there was a greater postexercise hypotension as a function of exercise intensity as measured at the end of the 20-min exercise recovery. Thus it is plausible that the increase in postexercise threshold may be related to postexercise hypotension. It is concluded that the sweating response during upright recovery is significantly modified by exercise intensity and may likely be influenced by the nonthermal baroreceptor reflex adjustments postexercise.

AB - The hypothesis that the magnitude of the postexercise onset threshold for sweating is increased by the intensity of exercise was tested in eight subjects. Esophageal temperature was monitored as an index of core temperature while sweat rate was measured by using a ventilated capsule placed on the upper back. Subjects remained seated resting for 15 min (no exercise) or performed 15 min of treadmill running at either 55, 70, or 85% of peak oxygen consumption (V(o2 peak)) followed by a 20-min seated recovery. Subjects then donned a liquid-conditioned suit used to regulate mean skin temperature. The suit was first perfused with 20 degrees C water to control and stabilize skin and core temperature before whole body heating. Subsequently, the skin was heated ( approximately 4.0 degrees C/h) until sweating occurred. Exercise resulted in an increase in the onset threshold for sweating of 0.11 +/- 0.02, 0.23 +/- 0.01, and 0.33 +/- 0.02 degrees C above that measured for the no-exercise resting values (P < 0.05) for the 55, 70, and 85% of V(o2 peak) exercise conditions, respectively. We did note that there was a greater postexercise hypotension as a function of exercise intensity as measured at the end of the 20-min exercise recovery. Thus it is plausible that the increase in postexercise threshold may be related to postexercise hypotension. It is concluded that the sweating response during upright recovery is significantly modified by exercise intensity and may likely be influenced by the nonthermal baroreceptor reflex adjustments postexercise.

KW - Anaerobic Threshold

KW - Blood Pressure

KW - Body Composition

KW - Body Temperature

KW - Esophagus

KW - Exercise

KW - Heart Rate

KW - Hemodynamics

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Oxygen Consumption

KW - Running

KW - Skin Temperature

KW - Sweating

KW - Temperature

KW - Clinical Trial

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00651.2003

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00651.2003

M3 - Article

VL - 95

SP - 2355

EP - 2360

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology

SN - 1522-1601

IS - 6

ER -