Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense

Simon J. Summers, Siobhan M. Schabrun, Rogerio P. Hirata, Thomas Graven-Nielsen, Rocco Cavaleri, Lucy S. Chipchase

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Abstract

Introduction: Joint position sense (JPS) is impaired in clinical musculoskeletal pain conditions, but when this impairment develops in the transition from initial to prolonged pain is not known. Objectives: This study assessed whether progressively developing sustained experimentally induced muscle pain impacts JPS in healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-eight healthy individuals received injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the right extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle on days 0 and 2 to induce sustained pain and hyperalgesia. Wrist JPS was assessed 2 days before day 0 (day -2), before the injection on days 0 and 2, and on days 4 and 14. Joint position sense was quantified as the ability to return the wrist to a neutral position following movements in the direction of radial and ulnar deviation. A 3-dimensional motion analysis system was used to calculate absolute, relative, and joint-angle repositioning errors. Numerical rating scale scores of pain intensity, body chart pain drawings, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on each day. Results: Compared with baseline, pressure pain thresholds decreased while pain intensity and area increased at day 2 (P < 0.001) and day 4 (P < 0.001) before returning to baseline on day 14 (P > 0.13). Relative to day 0, there was no change in wrist JPS at day 2, 4, and 14 following movements in either target direction (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Despite the presence of sustained muscle pain and hyperalgesia for 4 days at the elbow, no statistical change in wrist joint position error was observed. These findings suggest that pain and hyperalgesia lasting as long as 4 days does not impair JPS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number737
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalPain Reports
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

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Proprioception
Myalgia
Joints
Wrist Joint
Pain
Hyperalgesia
Pain Threshold
Pressure
Musculoskeletal Pain
Injections
Aptitude
Nerve Growth Factor
Elbow
Wrist
Muscles

Cite this

Summers, S. J., Schabrun, S. M., Hirata, R. P., Graven-Nielsen, T., Cavaleri, R., & Chipchase, L. S. (2019). Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense. Pain Reports, 4(3), 1-8. [737]. https://doi.org/10.1097/PR9.0000000000000737
Summers, Simon J. ; Schabrun, Siobhan M. ; Hirata, Rogerio P. ; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas ; Cavaleri, Rocco ; Chipchase, Lucy S. / Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense. In: Pain Reports. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 1-8.
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abstract = "Introduction: Joint position sense (JPS) is impaired in clinical musculoskeletal pain conditions, but when this impairment develops in the transition from initial to prolonged pain is not known. Objectives: This study assessed whether progressively developing sustained experimentally induced muscle pain impacts JPS in healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-eight healthy individuals received injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the right extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle on days 0 and 2 to induce sustained pain and hyperalgesia. Wrist JPS was assessed 2 days before day 0 (day -2), before the injection on days 0 and 2, and on days 4 and 14. Joint position sense was quantified as the ability to return the wrist to a neutral position following movements in the direction of radial and ulnar deviation. A 3-dimensional motion analysis system was used to calculate absolute, relative, and joint-angle repositioning errors. Numerical rating scale scores of pain intensity, body chart pain drawings, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on each day. Results: Compared with baseline, pressure pain thresholds decreased while pain intensity and area increased at day 2 (P < 0.001) and day 4 (P < 0.001) before returning to baseline on day 14 (P > 0.13). Relative to day 0, there was no change in wrist JPS at day 2, 4, and 14 following movements in either target direction (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Despite the presence of sustained muscle pain and hyperalgesia for 4 days at the elbow, no statistical change in wrist joint position error was observed. These findings suggest that pain and hyperalgesia lasting as long as 4 days does not impair JPS.",
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Summers, SJ, Schabrun, SM, Hirata, RP, Graven-Nielsen, T, Cavaleri, R & Chipchase, LS 2019, 'Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense', Pain Reports, vol. 4, no. 3, 737, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/PR9.0000000000000737

Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense. / Summers, Simon J.; Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Hirata, Rogerio P.; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Cavaleri, Rocco; Chipchase, Lucy S.

In: Pain Reports, Vol. 4, No. 3, 737, 01.05.2019, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense

AU - Summers, Simon J.

AU - Schabrun, Siobhan M.

AU - Hirata, Rogerio P.

AU - Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

AU - Cavaleri, Rocco

AU - Chipchase, Lucy S.

N1 - Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of The International Association for the Study of Pain.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Introduction: Joint position sense (JPS) is impaired in clinical musculoskeletal pain conditions, but when this impairment develops in the transition from initial to prolonged pain is not known. Objectives: This study assessed whether progressively developing sustained experimentally induced muscle pain impacts JPS in healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-eight healthy individuals received injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the right extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle on days 0 and 2 to induce sustained pain and hyperalgesia. Wrist JPS was assessed 2 days before day 0 (day -2), before the injection on days 0 and 2, and on days 4 and 14. Joint position sense was quantified as the ability to return the wrist to a neutral position following movements in the direction of radial and ulnar deviation. A 3-dimensional motion analysis system was used to calculate absolute, relative, and joint-angle repositioning errors. Numerical rating scale scores of pain intensity, body chart pain drawings, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on each day. Results: Compared with baseline, pressure pain thresholds decreased while pain intensity and area increased at day 2 (P < 0.001) and day 4 (P < 0.001) before returning to baseline on day 14 (P > 0.13). Relative to day 0, there was no change in wrist JPS at day 2, 4, and 14 following movements in either target direction (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Despite the presence of sustained muscle pain and hyperalgesia for 4 days at the elbow, no statistical change in wrist joint position error was observed. These findings suggest that pain and hyperalgesia lasting as long as 4 days does not impair JPS.

AB - Introduction: Joint position sense (JPS) is impaired in clinical musculoskeletal pain conditions, but when this impairment develops in the transition from initial to prolonged pain is not known. Objectives: This study assessed whether progressively developing sustained experimentally induced muscle pain impacts JPS in healthy individuals. Methods: Twenty-eight healthy individuals received injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into the right extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle on days 0 and 2 to induce sustained pain and hyperalgesia. Wrist JPS was assessed 2 days before day 0 (day -2), before the injection on days 0 and 2, and on days 4 and 14. Joint position sense was quantified as the ability to return the wrist to a neutral position following movements in the direction of radial and ulnar deviation. A 3-dimensional motion analysis system was used to calculate absolute, relative, and joint-angle repositioning errors. Numerical rating scale scores of pain intensity, body chart pain drawings, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on each day. Results: Compared with baseline, pressure pain thresholds decreased while pain intensity and area increased at day 2 (P < 0.001) and day 4 (P < 0.001) before returning to baseline on day 14 (P > 0.13). Relative to day 0, there was no change in wrist JPS at day 2, 4, and 14 following movements in either target direction (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Despite the presence of sustained muscle pain and hyperalgesia for 4 days at the elbow, no statistical change in wrist joint position error was observed. These findings suggest that pain and hyperalgesia lasting as long as 4 days does not impair JPS.

KW - Experimental pain

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Summers SJ, Schabrun SM, Hirata RP, Graven-Nielsen T, Cavaleri R, Chipchase LS. Effect of sustained experimental muscle pain on joint position sense. Pain Reports. 2019 May 1;4(3):1-8. 737. https://doi.org/10.1097/PR9.0000000000000737