Effectiveness of post-match recovery strategies in rugby players

Nicholas D. Gill, C.M. Beaven, C. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

189 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of four interventions on the rate and magnitude of muscle damage recovery, as measured by creatine kinase (CK). Methods: 23 elite male rugby players were monitored transdermally before, immediately after, 36 hours after, and 84 hours after competitive rugby matches. Players were randomly assigned to complete one of four post-match strategies: contrast water therapy (CWT), compression garment (GAR), low intensity active exercise (ACT), and passive recovery (PAS). Results: Significant increases in CK activity in transdermal exudate were observed as a result of the rugby match (p<0.01). The magnitude of recovery in the PAS intervention was significantly worse than in the ACT, CWT, and GAR interventions at the 36 and 84 hour time points (p<0.05). Conclusions: An enhanced rate and magnitude of recovery was observed in the ACT, CWT, and GAR treatment groups when compared with the PAS group. Low impact exercise immediately post-competition, wearing compression garments, or carrying out contrast water therapy enhanced CK clearance more than passive recovery in young male athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-263
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Football
Clothing
Creatine Kinase
Exercise
Water
Therapeutics
Exudates and Transudates
Athletes
Muscles

Cite this

Gill, Nicholas D. ; Beaven, C.M. ; Cook, C. / Effectiveness of post-match recovery strategies in rugby players. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 260-263.
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Effectiveness of post-match recovery strategies in rugby players. / Gill, Nicholas D.; Beaven, C.M.; Cook, C.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 40, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 260-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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