Effects of Altering Trunk Position During Landings on Patellar Tendon Force and Pain

Rodrigo Scattone Silva, Craig R Purdam, Angela M Fearon, Wayne A Spratford, Claire Kenneally-Dabrowski, Peter Preston, Fábio V Serrão, James E Gaida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To verify the immediate effects of altering sagittal plane trunk position during jump-landings on lower limb biomechanics, patellar tendon force and pain of athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.

METHODS: Twenty-one elite male athletes were categorized into 3 groups, athletes with patellar tendinopathy (TG, n=7), asymptomatic athletes with patellar tendon abnormalities (AG, n=7) and asymptomatic athletes without tendon abnormalities (CG, n=7). A biomechanical evaluation was conducted while the athletes performed drop landings from a bench in a self-selected trunk position (SS). Afterwards, the athletes were randomly assigned to land with either a flexed trunk position (FLX) or an extended trunk position (EXT). Variables of interest for this study included sagittal plane peak kinematics, kinetics, patellar tendon force and pain during the landing tasks.

RESULTS: Peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and knee pain decreased in the FLX landing compared to the SS landing, regardless of group. In addition, peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force were smaller in the FLX landing compared to the EXT landing. The TG had smaller peak ankle dorsiflexion than the CG during jump-landings, regardless of trunk position.

CONCLUSION: Landing with greater trunk flexion decreased patellar tendon force in elite jumping athletes. An immediate decrease in knee pain was also observed in symptomatic athletes with a more flexed trunk position during landing. Increasing trunk flexion during landing might be an important strategy to reduce tendon overload in jumping athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2517-2527
Number of pages11
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume49
Issue number12
Early online date12 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Patellar Ligament
Athletes
Pain
Knee
Tendinopathy
Biomechanical Phenomena
Tendons
Ankle
Lower Extremity

Cite this

Scattone Silva, Rodrigo ; Purdam, Craig R ; Fearon, Angela M ; Spratford, Wayne A ; Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire ; Preston, Peter ; Serrão, Fábio V ; Gaida, James E. / Effects of Altering Trunk Position During Landings on Patellar Tendon Force and Pain. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 12. pp. 2517-2527.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To verify the immediate effects of altering sagittal plane trunk position during jump-landings on lower limb biomechanics, patellar tendon force and pain of athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.METHODS: Twenty-one elite male athletes were categorized into 3 groups, athletes with patellar tendinopathy (TG, n=7), asymptomatic athletes with patellar tendon abnormalities (AG, n=7) and asymptomatic athletes without tendon abnormalities (CG, n=7). A biomechanical evaluation was conducted while the athletes performed drop landings from a bench in a self-selected trunk position (SS). Afterwards, the athletes were randomly assigned to land with either a flexed trunk position (FLX) or an extended trunk position (EXT). Variables of interest for this study included sagittal plane peak kinematics, kinetics, patellar tendon force and pain during the landing tasks.RESULTS: Peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and knee pain decreased in the FLX landing compared to the SS landing, regardless of group. In addition, peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force were smaller in the FLX landing compared to the EXT landing. The TG had smaller peak ankle dorsiflexion than the CG during jump-landings, regardless of trunk position.CONCLUSION: Landing with greater trunk flexion decreased patellar tendon force in elite jumping athletes. An immediate decrease in knee pain was also observed in symptomatic athletes with a more flexed trunk position during landing. Increasing trunk flexion during landing might be an important strategy to reduce tendon overload in jumping athletes.",
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Effects of Altering Trunk Position During Landings on Patellar Tendon Force and Pain. / Scattone Silva, Rodrigo; Purdam, Craig R; Fearon, Angela M; Spratford, Wayne A; Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire; Preston, Peter; Serrão, Fábio V; Gaida, James E.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 49, No. 12, 2017, p. 2517-2527.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of Altering Trunk Position During Landings on Patellar Tendon Force and Pain

AU - Scattone Silva, Rodrigo

AU - Purdam, Craig R

AU - Fearon, Angela M

AU - Spratford, Wayne A

AU - Kenneally-Dabrowski, Claire

AU - Preston, Peter

AU - Serrão, Fábio V

AU - Gaida, James E

PY - 2017

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N2 - PURPOSE: To verify the immediate effects of altering sagittal plane trunk position during jump-landings on lower limb biomechanics, patellar tendon force and pain of athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.METHODS: Twenty-one elite male athletes were categorized into 3 groups, athletes with patellar tendinopathy (TG, n=7), asymptomatic athletes with patellar tendon abnormalities (AG, n=7) and asymptomatic athletes without tendon abnormalities (CG, n=7). A biomechanical evaluation was conducted while the athletes performed drop landings from a bench in a self-selected trunk position (SS). Afterwards, the athletes were randomly assigned to land with either a flexed trunk position (FLX) or an extended trunk position (EXT). Variables of interest for this study included sagittal plane peak kinematics, kinetics, patellar tendon force and pain during the landing tasks.RESULTS: Peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and knee pain decreased in the FLX landing compared to the SS landing, regardless of group. In addition, peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force were smaller in the FLX landing compared to the EXT landing. The TG had smaller peak ankle dorsiflexion than the CG during jump-landings, regardless of trunk position.CONCLUSION: Landing with greater trunk flexion decreased patellar tendon force in elite jumping athletes. An immediate decrease in knee pain was also observed in symptomatic athletes with a more flexed trunk position during landing. Increasing trunk flexion during landing might be an important strategy to reduce tendon overload in jumping athletes.

AB - PURPOSE: To verify the immediate effects of altering sagittal plane trunk position during jump-landings on lower limb biomechanics, patellar tendon force and pain of athletes with and without patellar tendinopathy.METHODS: Twenty-one elite male athletes were categorized into 3 groups, athletes with patellar tendinopathy (TG, n=7), asymptomatic athletes with patellar tendon abnormalities (AG, n=7) and asymptomatic athletes without tendon abnormalities (CG, n=7). A biomechanical evaluation was conducted while the athletes performed drop landings from a bench in a self-selected trunk position (SS). Afterwards, the athletes were randomly assigned to land with either a flexed trunk position (FLX) or an extended trunk position (EXT). Variables of interest for this study included sagittal plane peak kinematics, kinetics, patellar tendon force and pain during the landing tasks.RESULTS: Peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and knee pain decreased in the FLX landing compared to the SS landing, regardless of group. In addition, peak patellar tendon force, knee extensor moment and vertical ground reaction force were smaller in the FLX landing compared to the EXT landing. The TG had smaller peak ankle dorsiflexion than the CG during jump-landings, regardless of trunk position.CONCLUSION: Landing with greater trunk flexion decreased patellar tendon force in elite jumping athletes. An immediate decrease in knee pain was also observed in symptomatic athletes with a more flexed trunk position during landing. Increasing trunk flexion during landing might be an important strategy to reduce tendon overload in jumping athletes.

KW - Jumpers knee

KW - Tendinosis

KW - Biomechanics

KW - Tendon

KW - Volleyball

KW - Basketball

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DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001369

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SP - 2517

EP - 2527

JO - Medicine Science in Sports Exercise

JF - Medicine Science in Sports Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

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ER -