Effects of athlete-dependent traits on joint and system countermovement-jump power

Kym J. Williams, Dale W. Chapman, Elissa J. Phillips, Nick Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To establish the influence of athlete-dependent characteristics on the generation and timing of system and individual joint powers during a countermovement jump (CMJ). Methods: Male national representative athletes from volleyball (n = 7), basketball (n = 6), and rugby (n = 7) performed a set of 3 CMJs at relative barbell loads of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of absolute back-squat strength. Ground-reaction forces and joint kinematics were captured using a 16-camera motion-capture system integrated with 2 in-ground force plates. Limb lengths and cross-sectional areas were defined using 3-dimensional photonic scans. A repeated-measures analysis of variance determined the interaction between system and joint load–power profiles, whereas a multiregression analysis defined the explained variance of athlete-dependent characteristics on the load that maximized system power. Results: System and isolated hip, knee, and ankle peak powers were maximized across a spectrum of loads between and within sports; power values were not significantly different across loads. A positive shift in the timing of hip and ankle peak powers corresponded to a significant (P < .05) positive shift in the timing of system peak power to occur closer to toe-off. An optimal 3-input combination of athlete-dependent characteristics accounted for 68% (P < .001) of the explained variance in the load that maximized system peak power. Conclusion: The load maximizing system power is athlete-dependent, with a mixture of training and heredity-related characteristics influencing CMJ load–power profiles. The authors recommend that a combination of relative loads be individually prescribed to maximize the generation and translation of system CMJ power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1378-1385
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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Athletes
Joints
Ankle
Hip
Volleyball
Optics and Photonics
Basketball
Heredity
Football
Toes
Biomechanical Phenomena
Sports
Knee
Analysis of Variance
Extremities

Cite this

Williams, Kym J. ; Chapman, Dale W. ; Phillips, Elissa J. ; Ball, Nick. / Effects of athlete-dependent traits on joint and system countermovement-jump power. In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1378-1385.
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abstract = "Purpose: To establish the influence of athlete-dependent characteristics on the generation and timing of system and individual joint powers during a countermovement jump (CMJ). Methods: Male national representative athletes from volleyball (n = 7), basketball (n = 6), and rugby (n = 7) performed a set of 3 CMJs at relative barbell loads of 0{\%}, 10{\%}, 20{\%}, 30{\%}, and 40{\%} of absolute back-squat strength. Ground-reaction forces and joint kinematics were captured using a 16-camera motion-capture system integrated with 2 in-ground force plates. Limb lengths and cross-sectional areas were defined using 3-dimensional photonic scans. A repeated-measures analysis of variance determined the interaction between system and joint load–power profiles, whereas a multiregression analysis defined the explained variance of athlete-dependent characteristics on the load that maximized system power. Results: System and isolated hip, knee, and ankle peak powers were maximized across a spectrum of loads between and within sports; power values were not significantly different across loads. A positive shift in the timing of hip and ankle peak powers corresponded to a significant (P < .05) positive shift in the timing of system peak power to occur closer to toe-off. An optimal 3-input combination of athlete-dependent characteristics accounted for 68{\%} (P < .001) of the explained variance in the load that maximized system peak power. Conclusion: The load maximizing system power is athlete-dependent, with a mixture of training and heredity-related characteristics influencing CMJ load–power profiles. The authors recommend that a combination of relative loads be individually prescribed to maximize the generation and translation of system CMJ power.",
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Effects of athlete-dependent traits on joint and system countermovement-jump power. / Williams, Kym J.; Chapman, Dale W.; Phillips, Elissa J.; Ball, Nick.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.11.2018, p. 1378-1385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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SN - 1555-0265

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