Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Paper

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Abstract

Traditionally, the social mandate of universities has been to contribute to betterment of humanity by gaining an understanding of how the world works and to pass on these knowledges. However, universities have become increasingly contributors to creating and maintaining a Western worldview that has led to a dysfunctional culture and society that creates suffering rather than health and well-being of citizens and other living creatures. Fortunately, growing recognition of this pathway being destructive and that collaboration with society is necessary to address wicked problems, is leading to universities remembering their original mandate and desiring to engage again with governments, NGOs, businesses and community agencies. However, commonly collaboration partners experience many challenges in effectively working together. On the one side, interdisciplinary and intersectorial collaboration is complex and dynamic due to diverse and often conflicting knowledges, interests, needs and expectations partners bring to the table. On the other side, there is generally a lack of knowledge and experience how to effectively collaborate with people and organisations with diverse backgrounds. Additionally, governance systems and process are typically unsuitable for collaborating. Together, these two aspects create complex, rapidly changing and challenging contexts for working together. In this presentation, I offer the key trials and tribulations as well as learnings from two interdisciplinary and intersectorial community-based participatory action research projects with Indigenous communities in Australia and Taiwan. I propose that co-designed, co-implemented and co-evaluated community-based participatory action research with Indigenous peoples that are long-term, emergent interdisciplinary and intersectorial and are utilizing sociocracy as governance system could be an effective pathway for universities to fulfil their social responsibilities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-49
Number of pages49
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019
EventInvited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan - Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China
Duration: 30 Nov 20191 Dec 2019
https://usrexpo.tca.org.tw/

Conference

ConferenceInvited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan
CountryTaiwan, Province of China
CityKaohsiung
Period30/11/191/12/19
Internet address

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Buergelt, P. (2019). Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities.. 1-49. Paper presented at Invited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China.
Buergelt, Petra. / Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities. Paper presented at Invited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China.49 p.
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abstract = "Traditionally, the social mandate of universities has been to contribute to betterment of humanity by gaining an understanding of how the world works and to pass on these knowledges. However, universities have become increasingly contributors to creating and maintaining a Western worldview that has led to a dysfunctional culture and society that creates suffering rather than health and well-being of citizens and other living creatures. Fortunately, growing recognition of this pathway being destructive and that collaboration with society is necessary to address wicked problems, is leading to universities remembering their original mandate and desiring to engage again with governments, NGOs, businesses and community agencies. However, commonly collaboration partners experience many challenges in effectively working together. On the one side, interdisciplinary and intersectorial collaboration is complex and dynamic due to diverse and often conflicting knowledges, interests, needs and expectations partners bring to the table. On the other side, there is generally a lack of knowledge and experience how to effectively collaborate with people and organisations with diverse backgrounds. Additionally, governance systems and process are typically unsuitable for collaborating. Together, these two aspects create complex, rapidly changing and challenging contexts for working together. In this presentation, I offer the key trials and tribulations as well as learnings from two interdisciplinary and intersectorial community-based participatory action research projects with Indigenous communities in Australia and Taiwan. I propose that co-designed, co-implemented and co-evaluated community-based participatory action research with Indigenous peoples that are long-term, emergent interdisciplinary and intersectorial and are utilizing sociocracy as governance system could be an effective pathway for universities to fulfil their social responsibilities.",
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author = "Petra Buergelt",
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Buergelt, P 2019, 'Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities.' Paper presented at Invited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China, 30/11/19 - 1/12/19, pp. 1-49.

Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities. / Buergelt, Petra.

2019. 1-49 Paper presented at Invited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Paper

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KW - social responsibility

KW - social impact

KW - Indigenist participatory action research

KW - Critical Indigenous methodologies

KW - consortia research

KW - Transdisciplinary research

UR - https://usrexpo.tca.org.tw/

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UR - https://chinapost.nownews.com/20191129-878363

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Buergelt P. Enacting Social Responsibility: Navigating the Wild Waters of Working Together with Diverse Partners and Communities.. 2019. Paper presented at Invited key note address at the International University Social Responsibility (USR) EXPO, Center for University Social Responsibility and the Ministry of Education in Taiwan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Province of China.