Engagement with news on Twitter: insights from Australia and Korea

Robert Ackland, Mathieu O'NEIL, Sora PARK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the patterns of news engagement among news consumers with different political affiliation and cultural background. We use computational methods and data from Twitter in a cross-country comparison of engagement with six online news sources in Australia and South Korea. For our analysis, we used a subset of Twitter users who retweeted at least one political story during the period of collection, and for whom we were able to predict political affiliation using correspondence analysis and data on Twitter follower ties to politicians. We find that right-wing Australian retweeters are more intense in their news engagement, compared with their left-wing counterparts, whereas in South Korea it was the opposite. Australian right-wing political retweeters have more diverse information sources, while there was no difference in information diversity between the right and left in South Korea. We discuss how the political situation in South Korea at the time of data collection may have affected our analysis. We emphasise the methodological contributions of our research and its connection to on-going research into the behavioural foundations of ‘filter bubbles’.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-251
Number of pages17
JournalAsian Journal of Communication
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2019

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Engagement with news on Twitter: insights from Australia and Korea. / Ackland, Robert; O'NEIL, Mathieu; PARK, Sora.

In: Asian Journal of Communication, Vol. 29, No. 3, 04.05.2019, p. 235-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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