Enough Is Enough

Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia

Grant Revell, Scott HEYES, David Jones, Daryl Low-Choy, Richard Tucker, Susan Bird

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the critical importance of ethical Indigenous knowledge engagement in the knowing of living heritage landscapes and their associated built environment education, and professional practices across Australia. Recent pedagogical research undertaken by the authors across all Australian universities that teach in the built environment disciplines of architecture, planning and landscape architecture has revealed a lack of understanding of Indigenous knowledges in these professionally accredited courses (Jones et. al. 2013, 2017; Tucker et. al. 2016). We argue that the ethical incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems, through teaching strategies that are developed in partnership with Indigenous stakeholders, will contribute to scaffolding a transformation in intercultural built environment education in Australia, along with prospective changes to professional institute education policies (AACA/AIA 2012; AILA 2016; PIA 2016). Such genuine collaboration with Indigenous partners is necessary to ensure that Indigenous perspectives of ‘Country’ and living heritage are clearly understood and experienced by built environment students at the formal academic and professional career-building stages of their lifelong learning. Critically, this paper presents new ways of approaching Australian built environment education and practice, using environmental design relevant exemplars, that can elevate and progress Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing. This research and associated applied practice contributes to a growing body of international literature indicating the potential of Indigenous pedagogy and epistemologies within the tertiary education and professional practice context.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture
EditorsElizabeth Grant, Kelly Greenop, Alberti Refiti, Daniel Glenn
Place of PublicationSingapore, Singapore
PublisherSpringer
Chapter18
Pages465-493
Number of pages29
Volume1
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9789811069048
ISBN (Print)9789811069048
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

knowledge
education
environmental design
professional career
academic career
lifelong learning
teaching strategy
epistemology
stakeholder
planning
university
lack
student
literature

Cite this

Revell, G., HEYES, S., Jones, D., Low-Choy, D., Tucker, R., & Bird, S. (2018). Enough Is Enough: Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia. In E. Grant, K. Greenop, A. Refiti, & D. Glenn (Eds.), The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture (1 ed., Vol. 1, pp. 465-493). Singapore, Singapore: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18
Revell, Grant ; HEYES, Scott ; Jones, David ; Low-Choy, Daryl ; Tucker, Richard ; Bird, Susan. / Enough Is Enough : Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia. The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. editor / Elizabeth Grant ; Kelly Greenop ; Alberti Refiti ; Daniel Glenn. Vol. 1 1. ed. Singapore, Singapore : Springer, 2018. pp. 465-493
@inbook{03cb30aa84ce4db48e7a4e89fc6b0aa9,
title = "Enough Is Enough: Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia",
abstract = "This chapter explores the critical importance of ethical Indigenous knowledge engagement in the knowing of living heritage landscapes and their associated built environment education, and professional practices across Australia. Recent pedagogical research undertaken by the authors across all Australian universities that teach in the built environment disciplines of architecture, planning and landscape architecture has revealed a lack of understanding of Indigenous knowledges in these professionally accredited courses (Jones et. al. 2013, 2017; Tucker et. al. 2016). We argue that the ethical incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems, through teaching strategies that are developed in partnership with Indigenous stakeholders, will contribute to scaffolding a transformation in intercultural built environment education in Australia, along with prospective changes to professional institute education policies (AACA/AIA 2012; AILA 2016; PIA 2016). Such genuine collaboration with Indigenous partners is necessary to ensure that Indigenous perspectives of ‘Country’ and living heritage are clearly understood and experienced by built environment students at the formal academic and professional career-building stages of their lifelong learning. Critically, this paper presents new ways of approaching Australian built environment education and practice, using environmental design relevant exemplars, that can elevate and progress Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing. This research and associated applied practice contributes to a growing body of international literature indicating the potential of Indigenous pedagogy and epistemologies within the tertiary education and professional practice context.",
keywords = "Architecture, Built Environment, Architecture Education, Indigenous studies, pedagogical, Landscape Architecture, URband planning",
author = "Grant Revell and Scott HEYES and David Jones and Daryl Low-Choy and Richard Tucker and Susan Bird",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789811069048",
volume = "1",
pages = "465--493",
editor = "Elizabeth Grant and Kelly Greenop and Alberti Refiti and Daniel Glenn",
booktitle = "The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture",
publisher = "Springer",
address = "Netherlands",
edition = "1",

}

Revell, G, HEYES, S, Jones, D, Low-Choy, D, Tucker, R & Bird, S 2018, Enough Is Enough: Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia. in E Grant, K Greenop, A Refiti & D Glenn (eds), The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. 1 edn, vol. 1, Springer, Singapore, Singapore, pp. 465-493. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18

Enough Is Enough : Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia. / Revell, Grant; HEYES, Scott; Jones, David; Low-Choy, Daryl; Tucker, Richard; Bird, Susan.

The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. ed. / Elizabeth Grant; Kelly Greenop; Alberti Refiti; Daniel Glenn. Vol. 1 1. ed. Singapore, Singapore : Springer, 2018. p. 465-493.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Enough Is Enough

T2 - Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia

AU - Revell, Grant

AU - HEYES, Scott

AU - Jones, David

AU - Low-Choy, Daryl

AU - Tucker, Richard

AU - Bird, Susan

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This chapter explores the critical importance of ethical Indigenous knowledge engagement in the knowing of living heritage landscapes and their associated built environment education, and professional practices across Australia. Recent pedagogical research undertaken by the authors across all Australian universities that teach in the built environment disciplines of architecture, planning and landscape architecture has revealed a lack of understanding of Indigenous knowledges in these professionally accredited courses (Jones et. al. 2013, 2017; Tucker et. al. 2016). We argue that the ethical incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems, through teaching strategies that are developed in partnership with Indigenous stakeholders, will contribute to scaffolding a transformation in intercultural built environment education in Australia, along with prospective changes to professional institute education policies (AACA/AIA 2012; AILA 2016; PIA 2016). Such genuine collaboration with Indigenous partners is necessary to ensure that Indigenous perspectives of ‘Country’ and living heritage are clearly understood and experienced by built environment students at the formal academic and professional career-building stages of their lifelong learning. Critically, this paper presents new ways of approaching Australian built environment education and practice, using environmental design relevant exemplars, that can elevate and progress Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing. This research and associated applied practice contributes to a growing body of international literature indicating the potential of Indigenous pedagogy and epistemologies within the tertiary education and professional practice context.

AB - This chapter explores the critical importance of ethical Indigenous knowledge engagement in the knowing of living heritage landscapes and their associated built environment education, and professional practices across Australia. Recent pedagogical research undertaken by the authors across all Australian universities that teach in the built environment disciplines of architecture, planning and landscape architecture has revealed a lack of understanding of Indigenous knowledges in these professionally accredited courses (Jones et. al. 2013, 2017; Tucker et. al. 2016). We argue that the ethical incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems, through teaching strategies that are developed in partnership with Indigenous stakeholders, will contribute to scaffolding a transformation in intercultural built environment education in Australia, along with prospective changes to professional institute education policies (AACA/AIA 2012; AILA 2016; PIA 2016). Such genuine collaboration with Indigenous partners is necessary to ensure that Indigenous perspectives of ‘Country’ and living heritage are clearly understood and experienced by built environment students at the formal academic and professional career-building stages of their lifelong learning. Critically, this paper presents new ways of approaching Australian built environment education and practice, using environmental design relevant exemplars, that can elevate and progress Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing. This research and associated applied practice contributes to a growing body of international literature indicating the potential of Indigenous pedagogy and epistemologies within the tertiary education and professional practice context.

KW - Architecture

KW - Built Environment

KW - Architecture Education

KW - Indigenous studies

KW - pedagogical

KW - Landscape Architecture

KW - URband planning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053968061&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/enough-enough-indigenous-knowledge-systems-living-heritage-re-shaping-built-environment-design-educa

U2 - 10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18

DO - 10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9789811069048

VL - 1

SP - 465

EP - 493

BT - The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture

A2 - Grant, Elizabeth

A2 - Greenop, Kelly

A2 - Refiti, Alberti

A2 - Glenn, Daniel

PB - Springer

CY - Singapore, Singapore

ER -

Revell G, HEYES S, Jones D, Low-Choy D, Tucker R, Bird S. Enough Is Enough: Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Living Heritage and the (Re)Shaping of Built Environment Design Education in Australia. In Grant E, Greenop K, Refiti A, Glenn D, editors, The Handbook of Contemporary Indigenous Architecture. 1 ed. Vol. 1. Singapore, Singapore: Springer. 2018. p. 465-493 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-6904-8_18