Evaluation of human resource development knowledge outcomes: learning boundaries, mental models and boundary objects

Deborah Blackman, Liz Lee-Kelley

    Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

    Abstract

    This paper argues that the stated learning outcomes emphasis of current human resource development evaluation systems may be limiting the effective changes of behaviour they are aimed to achieve. Using the ‘learning boundary’ concept which scopes individual ability to comprehend, distil and incorporate new ideas and novel work methodologies for future application, we suggest that the learning boundaries which develop in an organisation, or in any sub-group within the organisation, indicate the nested learning processes of the prevailing mental models of the employees. The argument is made that the prevailing focus upon boundary objects designed to measure outcomes in terms of skills development and concrete changes to job aptitude can reduce the range of outcome possibilities. New boundary objects need to be developed which will stretch learning boundaries and enable additional peripheral learning which is just as important for performance enhancement, creativity and organisational learning.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages1-9
    Number of pages9
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    EventGlobalisation versus Glocalisation - Oxford, United Kingdom
    Duration: 27 Jun 200729 Jun 2007

    Conference

    ConferenceGlobalisation versus Glocalisation
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityOxford
    Period27/06/0729/06/07

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    Blackman, D., & Lee-Kelley, L. (2007). Evaluation of human resource development knowledge outcomes: learning boundaries, mental models and boundary objects. 1-9. Abstract from Globalisation versus Glocalisation, Oxford, United Kingdom.