Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50

a systematic review with meta-analysis

JM Northey, Nicholas Cherbuin, KL Pumpa, DJ Smee, B Rattray

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

95 Citations (Scopus)
184 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background Physical exercise is seen as a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older, yet the evidence from reviews is not conclusive. Objectives To determine if physical exercise is effective in improving cognitive function in this population. Design Systematic review with multilevel meta-Analysis. Data sources Electronic databases Medline (PubMed), EMBASE (Scopus), PsychINFO and CENTRAL (Cochrane) from inception to November 2016. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of physical exercise interventions in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years, with an outcome measure of cognitive function. Results The search returned 12 820 records, of which 39 studies were included in the systematic review. Analysis of 333 dependent effect sizes from 36 studies showed that physical exercise improved cognitive function (0.29; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.41; p<0.01). Interventions of aerobic exercise, resistance training, multicomponent training and tai chi, all had significant point estimates. When exercise prescription was examined, a duration of 45-60 min per session and at least moderate intensity, were associated with benefits to cognition. The results of the meta-Analysis were consistent and independent of the cognitive domain tested or the cognitive status of the participants. Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. To improve cognitive function, this meta-Analysis provides clinicians with evidence to recommend that patients obtain both aerobic and resistance exercise of at least moderate intensity on as many days of the week as feasible, in line with current exercise guidelines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-160
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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Cognition
Meta-Analysis
Exercise
Tai Ji
Independent Living
Multilevel Analysis
Resistance Training
Information Storage and Retrieval
PubMed
Prescriptions
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Guidelines

Cite this

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title = "Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50: a systematic review with meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background Physical exercise is seen as a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older, yet the evidence from reviews is not conclusive. Objectives To determine if physical exercise is effective in improving cognitive function in this population. Design Systematic review with multilevel meta-Analysis. Data sources Electronic databases Medline (PubMed), EMBASE (Scopus), PsychINFO and CENTRAL (Cochrane) from inception to November 2016. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of physical exercise interventions in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years, with an outcome measure of cognitive function. Results The search returned 12 820 records, of which 39 studies were included in the systematic review. Analysis of 333 dependent effect sizes from 36 studies showed that physical exercise improved cognitive function (0.29; 95{\%} CI 0.17 to 0.41; p<0.01). Interventions of aerobic exercise, resistance training, multicomponent training and tai chi, all had significant point estimates. When exercise prescription was examined, a duration of 45-60 min per session and at least moderate intensity, were associated with benefits to cognition. The results of the meta-Analysis were consistent and independent of the cognitive domain tested or the cognitive status of the participants. Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. To improve cognitive function, this meta-Analysis provides clinicians with evidence to recommend that patients obtain both aerobic and resistance exercise of at least moderate intensity on as many days of the week as feasible, in line with current exercise guidelines.",
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Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50 : a systematic review with meta-analysis. / Northey, JM; Cherbuin, Nicholas; Pumpa, KL; Smee, DJ; Rattray, B.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.02.2018, p. 154-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise interventions for cognitive function in adults older than 50

T2 - a systematic review with meta-analysis

AU - Northey, JM

AU - Cherbuin, Nicholas

AU - Pumpa, KL

AU - Smee, DJ

AU - Rattray, B

N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Background Physical exercise is seen as a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older, yet the evidence from reviews is not conclusive. Objectives To determine if physical exercise is effective in improving cognitive function in this population. Design Systematic review with multilevel meta-Analysis. Data sources Electronic databases Medline (PubMed), EMBASE (Scopus), PsychINFO and CENTRAL (Cochrane) from inception to November 2016. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of physical exercise interventions in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years, with an outcome measure of cognitive function. Results The search returned 12 820 records, of which 39 studies were included in the systematic review. Analysis of 333 dependent effect sizes from 36 studies showed that physical exercise improved cognitive function (0.29; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.41; p<0.01). Interventions of aerobic exercise, resistance training, multicomponent training and tai chi, all had significant point estimates. When exercise prescription was examined, a duration of 45-60 min per session and at least moderate intensity, were associated with benefits to cognition. The results of the meta-Analysis were consistent and independent of the cognitive domain tested or the cognitive status of the participants. Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. To improve cognitive function, this meta-Analysis provides clinicians with evidence to recommend that patients obtain both aerobic and resistance exercise of at least moderate intensity on as many days of the week as feasible, in line with current exercise guidelines.

AB - Background Physical exercise is seen as a promising intervention to prevent or delay cognitive decline in individuals aged 50 years and older, yet the evidence from reviews is not conclusive. Objectives To determine if physical exercise is effective in improving cognitive function in this population. Design Systematic review with multilevel meta-Analysis. Data sources Electronic databases Medline (PubMed), EMBASE (Scopus), PsychINFO and CENTRAL (Cochrane) from inception to November 2016. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials of physical exercise interventions in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years, with an outcome measure of cognitive function. Results The search returned 12 820 records, of which 39 studies were included in the systematic review. Analysis of 333 dependent effect sizes from 36 studies showed that physical exercise improved cognitive function (0.29; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.41; p<0.01). Interventions of aerobic exercise, resistance training, multicomponent training and tai chi, all had significant point estimates. When exercise prescription was examined, a duration of 45-60 min per session and at least moderate intensity, were associated with benefits to cognition. The results of the meta-Analysis were consistent and independent of the cognitive domain tested or the cognitive status of the participants. Conclusions Physical exercise improved cognitive function in the over 50s, regardless of the cognitive status of participants. To improve cognitive function, this meta-Analysis provides clinicians with evidence to recommend that patients obtain both aerobic and resistance exercise of at least moderate intensity on as many days of the week as feasible, in line with current exercise guidelines.

KW - ageing

KW - cognition

KW - executive function

KW - memory

KW - physical exercise

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U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096587

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096587

M3 - Review article

VL - 52

SP - 154

EP - 160

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

IS - 3

ER -