Experiencing food insecurity – perspectives from those relying on food charities

Tanya LAWLIS, Maggie JAMIESON

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

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Abstract

Background/Aims: Previous stereotypes of people who are food insecure are no longer valid; food insecurity is experienced by diverse people in different ways. Food is multifaceted, while providing nutrients for the body, it also engenders social connection. This study explores food security from the perspective of people who experience food insecurity.
Methods: A qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with a researcher previously known to some participants, who were accessing food charities as their main source of food. Fourteen men and one woman were interviewed. Data was analysed independently by the researchers and key themes derived.
Results: Emerging themes included: dependency on charity as essential provider of food; enabling stability in living arrangements. Charity attendance was an essential part of social connectedness. Interestingly, the woman reported a sense vulnerability seeking food from a charity. All had intermittent periods being homeless. Alcohol, drugs, smoking, poor dentition, and mental illness contributed to homelessness and food insecurity. Food provision was variable in quality, yet plentiful, with a tendency towards being high in carbohydrate and fat. Weight gain is an issue. Paradoxically, participant knowledge of food and diet was exceptional, as was self-awareness of their health and how they lived.
Conclusions: This vulnerable group, demonstrate a dependency on food charity to support them remaining in stable, secure, living arrangements, having regular food and social connections. Interestingly, variable food quality in itself impacts on their already labile health. The food relief sector is challenged whereby provision creates dependency, and this requires further exploration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-114
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Charities
Food Supply
food security
homeless people
Food
researchers
stereotyped behavior
behavior disorders
smoking (food products)
food quality
interviews
teeth
alcohols
weight gain
carbohydrates
drugs
nutrients
lipids
Research Personnel
diet

Cite this

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title = "Experiencing food insecurity – perspectives from those relying on food charities",
abstract = "Background/Aims: Previous stereotypes of people who are food insecure are no longer valid; food insecurity is experienced by diverse people in different ways. Food is multifaceted, while providing nutrients for the body, it also engenders social connection. This study explores food security from the perspective of people who experience food insecurity.Methods: A qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with a researcher previously known to some participants, who were accessing food charities as their main source of food. Fourteen men and one woman were interviewed. Data was analysed independently by the researchers and key themes derived.Results: Emerging themes included: dependency on charity as essential provider of food; enabling stability in living arrangements. Charity attendance was an essential part of social connectedness. Interestingly, the woman reported a sense vulnerability seeking food from a charity. All had intermittent periods being homeless. Alcohol, drugs, smoking, poor dentition, and mental illness contributed to homelessness and food insecurity. Food provision was variable in quality, yet plentiful, with a tendency towards being high in carbohydrate and fat. Weight gain is an issue. Paradoxically, participant knowledge of food and diet was exceptional, as was self-awareness of their health and how they lived.Conclusions: This vulnerable group, demonstrate a dependency on food charity to support them remaining in stable, secure, living arrangements, having regular food and social connections. Interestingly, variable food quality in itself impacts on their already labile health. The food relief sector is challenged whereby provision creates dependency, and this requires further exploration.",
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Experiencing food insecurity – perspectives from those relying on food charities. / LAWLIS, Tanya; JAMIESON, Maggie.

In: Journal of Nutrition and Intermediary Metabolism, Vol. 8, 2017, p. 113-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiencing food insecurity – perspectives from those relying on food charities

AU - LAWLIS, Tanya

AU - JAMIESON, Maggie

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background/Aims: Previous stereotypes of people who are food insecure are no longer valid; food insecurity is experienced by diverse people in different ways. Food is multifaceted, while providing nutrients for the body, it also engenders social connection. This study explores food security from the perspective of people who experience food insecurity.Methods: A qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with a researcher previously known to some participants, who were accessing food charities as their main source of food. Fourteen men and one woman were interviewed. Data was analysed independently by the researchers and key themes derived.Results: Emerging themes included: dependency on charity as essential provider of food; enabling stability in living arrangements. Charity attendance was an essential part of social connectedness. Interestingly, the woman reported a sense vulnerability seeking food from a charity. All had intermittent periods being homeless. Alcohol, drugs, smoking, poor dentition, and mental illness contributed to homelessness and food insecurity. Food provision was variable in quality, yet plentiful, with a tendency towards being high in carbohydrate and fat. Weight gain is an issue. Paradoxically, participant knowledge of food and diet was exceptional, as was self-awareness of their health and how they lived.Conclusions: This vulnerable group, demonstrate a dependency on food charity to support them remaining in stable, secure, living arrangements, having regular food and social connections. Interestingly, variable food quality in itself impacts on their already labile health. The food relief sector is challenged whereby provision creates dependency, and this requires further exploration.

AB - Background/Aims: Previous stereotypes of people who are food insecure are no longer valid; food insecurity is experienced by diverse people in different ways. Food is multifaceted, while providing nutrients for the body, it also engenders social connection. This study explores food security from the perspective of people who experience food insecurity.Methods: A qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with a researcher previously known to some participants, who were accessing food charities as their main source of food. Fourteen men and one woman were interviewed. Data was analysed independently by the researchers and key themes derived.Results: Emerging themes included: dependency on charity as essential provider of food; enabling stability in living arrangements. Charity attendance was an essential part of social connectedness. Interestingly, the woman reported a sense vulnerability seeking food from a charity. All had intermittent periods being homeless. Alcohol, drugs, smoking, poor dentition, and mental illness contributed to homelessness and food insecurity. Food provision was variable in quality, yet plentiful, with a tendency towards being high in carbohydrate and fat. Weight gain is an issue. Paradoxically, participant knowledge of food and diet was exceptional, as was self-awareness of their health and how they lived.Conclusions: This vulnerable group, demonstrate a dependency on food charity to support them remaining in stable, secure, living arrangements, having regular food and social connections. Interestingly, variable food quality in itself impacts on their already labile health. The food relief sector is challenged whereby provision creates dependency, and this requires further exploration.

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