Facial feature tracking

a psychophysiological measure to assess exercise intensity?

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to determine whether facial feature tracking reliably measures changes in facial movement across varying exercise intensities. Fifteen cyclists completed three, incremental intensity, cycling trials to exhaustion while their faces were recorded with video cameras. Facial feature tracking was found to be a moderately reliable measure of facial movement during incremental intensity cycling (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.65–0.68). Facial movement (whole face (WF), upper face (UF), lower face (LF) and head movement (HM)) increased with exercise intensity, from lactate threshold one (LT1) until attainment of maximal aerobic power (MAP) (WF 3464 ± 3364mm, P < 0.005; UF 1961 ± 1779mm, P = 0.002; LF 1608 ± 1404mm, P = 0.002; HM 849 ± 642mm, P < 0.001). UF movement was greater than LF movement at all exercise intensities (UF minus LF at: LT1, 1048 ± 383mm; LT2, 1208 ± 611mm; MAP, 1401 ± 712mm; P < 0.001). Significant medium to large non-linear relationships were found between facial movement and power output (r 2 = 0.24–0.31), HR (r 2 = 0.26–0.33), [La ] (r 2 = 0.33–0.44) and RPE (r 2 = 0.38–0.45). The findings demonstrate the potential utility of facial feature tracking as a non-invasive, psychophysiological measure to potentially assess exercise intensity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)934-941
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume36
Issue number8
Early online date30 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2018

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@article{37a03f8793744a4bb878134d9fcc5bd4,
title = "Facial feature tracking: a psychophysiological measure to assess exercise intensity?",
abstract = "The primary aim of this study was to determine whether facial feature tracking reliably measures changes in facial movement across varying exercise intensities. Fifteen cyclists completed three, incremental intensity, cycling trials to exhaustion while their faces were recorded with video cameras. Facial feature tracking was found to be a moderately reliable measure of facial movement during incremental intensity cycling (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.65–0.68). Facial movement (whole face (WF), upper face (UF), lower face (LF) and head movement (HM)) increased with exercise intensity, from lactate threshold one (LT1) until attainment of maximal aerobic power (MAP) (WF 3464 ± 3364mm, P < 0.005; UF 1961 ± 1779mm, P = 0.002; LF 1608 ± 1404mm, P = 0.002; HM 849 ± 642mm, P < 0.001). UF movement was greater than LF movement at all exercise intensities (UF minus LF at: LT1, 1048 ± 383mm; LT2, 1208 ± 611mm; MAP, 1401 ± 712mm; P < 0.001). Significant medium to large non-linear relationships were found between facial movement and power output (r 2 = 0.24–0.31), HR (r 2 = 0.26–0.33), [La −] (r 2 = 0.33–0.44) and RPE (r 2 = 0.38–0.45). The findings demonstrate the potential utility of facial feature tracking as a non-invasive, psychophysiological measure to potentially assess exercise intensity.",
keywords = "Facial expression, facial movement, exercise regulation, perceived exertion, affect, Physical Exertion/physiology, Heart Rate/physiology, Humans, Middle Aged, Perception/physiology, Facial Expression, Bicycling/physiology, Exercise/physiology, Lactic Acid/blood, Face/physiology, Video Recording, Adult, Time and Motion Studies, Head/physiology, Movement/physiology, Psychophysiology",
author = "Miles, {Kathleen H} and Bradley Clark and P{\'e}riard, {Julien D} and Roland Goecke and Thompson, {Kevin G}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1080/02640414.2017.1346275",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "934--941",
journal = "Journal of Sports Science",
issn = "0264-0414",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Facial feature tracking

T2 - a psychophysiological measure to assess exercise intensity?

AU - Miles, Kathleen H

AU - Clark, Bradley

AU - Périard, Julien D

AU - Goecke, Roland

AU - Thompson, Kevin G

PY - 2018/4/18

Y1 - 2018/4/18

N2 - The primary aim of this study was to determine whether facial feature tracking reliably measures changes in facial movement across varying exercise intensities. Fifteen cyclists completed three, incremental intensity, cycling trials to exhaustion while their faces were recorded with video cameras. Facial feature tracking was found to be a moderately reliable measure of facial movement during incremental intensity cycling (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.65–0.68). Facial movement (whole face (WF), upper face (UF), lower face (LF) and head movement (HM)) increased with exercise intensity, from lactate threshold one (LT1) until attainment of maximal aerobic power (MAP) (WF 3464 ± 3364mm, P < 0.005; UF 1961 ± 1779mm, P = 0.002; LF 1608 ± 1404mm, P = 0.002; HM 849 ± 642mm, P < 0.001). UF movement was greater than LF movement at all exercise intensities (UF minus LF at: LT1, 1048 ± 383mm; LT2, 1208 ± 611mm; MAP, 1401 ± 712mm; P < 0.001). Significant medium to large non-linear relationships were found between facial movement and power output (r 2 = 0.24–0.31), HR (r 2 = 0.26–0.33), [La −] (r 2 = 0.33–0.44) and RPE (r 2 = 0.38–0.45). The findings demonstrate the potential utility of facial feature tracking as a non-invasive, psychophysiological measure to potentially assess exercise intensity.

AB - The primary aim of this study was to determine whether facial feature tracking reliably measures changes in facial movement across varying exercise intensities. Fifteen cyclists completed three, incremental intensity, cycling trials to exhaustion while their faces were recorded with video cameras. Facial feature tracking was found to be a moderately reliable measure of facial movement during incremental intensity cycling (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.65–0.68). Facial movement (whole face (WF), upper face (UF), lower face (LF) and head movement (HM)) increased with exercise intensity, from lactate threshold one (LT1) until attainment of maximal aerobic power (MAP) (WF 3464 ± 3364mm, P < 0.005; UF 1961 ± 1779mm, P = 0.002; LF 1608 ± 1404mm, P = 0.002; HM 849 ± 642mm, P < 0.001). UF movement was greater than LF movement at all exercise intensities (UF minus LF at: LT1, 1048 ± 383mm; LT2, 1208 ± 611mm; MAP, 1401 ± 712mm; P < 0.001). Significant medium to large non-linear relationships were found between facial movement and power output (r 2 = 0.24–0.31), HR (r 2 = 0.26–0.33), [La −] (r 2 = 0.33–0.44) and RPE (r 2 = 0.38–0.45). The findings demonstrate the potential utility of facial feature tracking as a non-invasive, psychophysiological measure to potentially assess exercise intensity.

KW - Facial expression

KW - facial movement

KW - exercise regulation

KW - perceived exertion

KW - affect

KW - Physical Exertion/physiology

KW - Heart Rate/physiology

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Perception/physiology

KW - Facial Expression

KW - Bicycling/physiology

KW - Exercise/physiology

KW - Lactic Acid/blood

KW - Face/physiology

KW - Video Recording

KW - Adult

KW - Time and Motion Studies

KW - Head/physiology

KW - Movement/physiology

KW - Psychophysiology

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UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/facial-feature-tracking-psychophysiological-measure-assess-exercise-intensity-1

U2 - 10.1080/02640414.2017.1346275

DO - 10.1080/02640414.2017.1346275

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 934

EP - 941

JO - Journal of Sports Science

JF - Journal of Sports Science

SN - 0264-0414

IS - 8

ER -