Factors influencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's breastfeeding practice: A scoping narrative review

Charlene Xiaoling Zheng, Marjorie Atchan, Donna Hartz, Deborah Davis, Ella Kurz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The nutritional and health benefits of breastfeeding for infants and young children are well-established however rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are lower than non-Indigenous children. Aim: To describe factors influencing breastfeeding practice amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. Methods: A scoping narrative review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute framework. A search was conducted in four online databases (PubMed, Scopus, ANU SuperSearch, and Science Direct). Findings were analysed using [30] narrative synthesis. Findings: This review included 9 journal articles, a conference summary and a book. This review identified four factors influencing women's breastfeeding practice; sources of support, culturally appropriate care, intention to breastfeed and social determinants. Conclusion: Multiple social determinants resulting from colonization have interrupted traditional infant feeding practices and women's sources of support. Although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have strong intention to breastfeed, their breastfeeding outcomes are impacted by lack of pro-breastfeeding support when encountering breastfeeding challenges as well as norms surrounding the use of infant formula milk. Culturally appropriate care is essential for identifying women's needs and avoiding stereotyping. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of breastfeeding interventions for this group of women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-16
Number of pages6
JournalWomen and Birth
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Factors influencing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's breastfeeding practice: A scoping narrative review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this