Farmers' work-day noise exposure

Warwick Williams, Susan Brumby, Adrian Calvano, Tracey Hatherell, Heidi Mason, Catherine Mercer-Grant, Anthony HOGAN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to understand the extent of farmers' exposure to hazardous noise, and trial and test the ability of an on-farm noise audit report to improve awareness and preventative action towards farm based noise hazards. Design: Visits were made to working farms where noise and dosimetry measurements undertaken. During return visits, the noise measurements were explained in a brief report. A follow-up questionnaire was implemented gathering feedback on the use or otherwise of the report. Setting: Working farms in Western Victoria and SE Queensland including dairy, beef, wool, prime lamb and cropping. Participants: Participants were 14 female and 37 male farm workers. Interventions: Noise exposure assessment of daily activities through dosimetry; measurements of noisy tasks and machinery; supply and interpretation of a noise audit report. Main outcome measures: Participants were supplied with a 'noise report' of their workplace together with an explanation of the report's meaning to farm workers. Results: Men and women have similar at risk exposures. The average noise exposure was 1.09Pa2h (LAeq,8h=85.3dB). This implies 163000 Australian agricultural workers are at risk from hazardous noise. On-farm noise audit reports were a relevant and valuable feedback to farmers in relation to their potential noise hazards. Conclusions: Of those measured 51%, and by extrapolation 163000 Australian agricultural workers, have noise exposure levels greater than the recommended Australian Standard of 1.01Pa2h (85dB). Men and women are equally exposed. On-farm noise audit reports are an effective feedback to increase awareness and improve hearing health.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Rural Health
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Noise
Farmers
Queensland
Aptitude
Victoria
Wool
Workplace
Hearing
Farms
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

Williams, W., Brumby, S., Calvano, A., Hatherell, T., Mason, H., Mercer-Grant, C., & HOGAN, A. (2015). Farmers' work-day noise exposure. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 23(2), 67-73. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajr.12153
Williams, Warwick ; Brumby, Susan ; Calvano, Adrian ; Hatherell, Tracey ; Mason, Heidi ; Mercer-Grant, Catherine ; HOGAN, Anthony. / Farmers' work-day noise exposure. In: Australian Journal of Rural Health. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 67-73.
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Williams, W, Brumby, S, Calvano, A, Hatherell, T, Mason, H, Mercer-Grant, C & HOGAN, A 2015, 'Farmers' work-day noise exposure', Australian Journal of Rural Health, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 67-73. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajr.12153

Farmers' work-day noise exposure. / Williams, Warwick; Brumby, Susan; Calvano, Adrian; Hatherell, Tracey; Mason, Heidi; Mercer-Grant, Catherine; HOGAN, Anthony.

In: Australian Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2015, p. 67-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Farmers' work-day noise exposure

AU - Williams, Warwick

AU - Brumby, Susan

AU - Calvano, Adrian

AU - Hatherell, Tracey

AU - Mason, Heidi

AU - Mercer-Grant, Catherine

AU - HOGAN, Anthony

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective: This study aims to understand the extent of farmers' exposure to hazardous noise, and trial and test the ability of an on-farm noise audit report to improve awareness and preventative action towards farm based noise hazards. Design: Visits were made to working farms where noise and dosimetry measurements undertaken. During return visits, the noise measurements were explained in a brief report. A follow-up questionnaire was implemented gathering feedback on the use or otherwise of the report. Setting: Working farms in Western Victoria and SE Queensland including dairy, beef, wool, prime lamb and cropping. Participants: Participants were 14 female and 37 male farm workers. Interventions: Noise exposure assessment of daily activities through dosimetry; measurements of noisy tasks and machinery; supply and interpretation of a noise audit report. Main outcome measures: Participants were supplied with a 'noise report' of their workplace together with an explanation of the report's meaning to farm workers. Results: Men and women have similar at risk exposures. The average noise exposure was 1.09Pa2h (LAeq,8h=85.3dB). This implies 163000 Australian agricultural workers are at risk from hazardous noise. On-farm noise audit reports were a relevant and valuable feedback to farmers in relation to their potential noise hazards. Conclusions: Of those measured 51%, and by extrapolation 163000 Australian agricultural workers, have noise exposure levels greater than the recommended Australian Standard of 1.01Pa2h (85dB). Men and women are equally exposed. On-farm noise audit reports are an effective feedback to increase awareness and improve hearing health.

AB - Objective: This study aims to understand the extent of farmers' exposure to hazardous noise, and trial and test the ability of an on-farm noise audit report to improve awareness and preventative action towards farm based noise hazards. Design: Visits were made to working farms where noise and dosimetry measurements undertaken. During return visits, the noise measurements were explained in a brief report. A follow-up questionnaire was implemented gathering feedback on the use or otherwise of the report. Setting: Working farms in Western Victoria and SE Queensland including dairy, beef, wool, prime lamb and cropping. Participants: Participants were 14 female and 37 male farm workers. Interventions: Noise exposure assessment of daily activities through dosimetry; measurements of noisy tasks and machinery; supply and interpretation of a noise audit report. Main outcome measures: Participants were supplied with a 'noise report' of their workplace together with an explanation of the report's meaning to farm workers. Results: Men and women have similar at risk exposures. The average noise exposure was 1.09Pa2h (LAeq,8h=85.3dB). This implies 163000 Australian agricultural workers are at risk from hazardous noise. On-farm noise audit reports were a relevant and valuable feedback to farmers in relation to their potential noise hazards. Conclusions: Of those measured 51%, and by extrapolation 163000 Australian agricultural workers, have noise exposure levels greater than the recommended Australian Standard of 1.01Pa2h (85dB). Men and women are equally exposed. On-farm noise audit reports are an effective feedback to increase awareness and improve hearing health.

KW - Farm noise

KW - Hearing loss

KW - Noise management

KW - On-farm noise audit

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JO - The Australian journal of rural health

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Williams W, Brumby S, Calvano A, Hatherell T, Mason H, Mercer-Grant C et al. Farmers' work-day noise exposure. Australian Journal of Rural Health. 2015;23(2):67-73. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajr.12153