Flights of Fancy: The Production, Reception and Implications of Lawrence Hargrave’s Magic Lantern Lecture ‘Lope de Vega’

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

This chapter considers a collection of magic lantern slides developed by the late nineteenth-century gentleman-inventor Lawrence Hargrave. Although best known for his early ideas and experimentation in aeronautics and for his efforts to build and test machines for manned flight, Hargrave also held a curious theory about the Spanish discovery and exploration of Australia. It is his unique, albeit circumstantial and unsubstantiated, hypothesis ‘Lope de Vega’ that forms the basis of his engagement with magic lantern technology. As a suite of slides it represents a strange confluence of images gathered, altered and ordered by Hargrave from a variety of sources. Among the eclectic assortment of raw materials Hargrave drew upon to build his visual argument were a number of rock engravings he had observed in Sydney Harbour. This chapter addresses the genesis, production and potential impacts of Hargrave’s magic lantern lecture.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Magic Lantern at Work
Subtitle of host publicationConnecting, Witnessing, Experiencing and Persuading
EditorsMartyn Jolly, Elisa deCourcy
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter8
Pages120–137
Number of pages18
Volume300
ISBN (Electronic)9780429317576
ISBN (Print)9780367322564
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameRoutledge Studies in Cultural History

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Flights of Fancy: The Production, Reception and Implications of Lawrence Hargrave’s Magic Lantern Lecture ‘Lope de Vega’'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Frederick, U. (2020). Flights of Fancy: The Production, Reception and Implications of Lawrence Hargrave’s Magic Lantern Lecture ‘Lope de Vega’. In M. Jolly, & E. deCourcy (Eds.), The Magic Lantern at Work: Connecting, Witnessing, Experiencing and Persuading (Vol. 300, pp. 120–137). (Routledge Studies in Cultural History). Routledge.