Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain

Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping

Will OSBORNE, Anke Maria Hoefer

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

In this paper we review all available records of reptiles and frogs of the Black Mountain area in order to describe its frog and reptile fauna, and to compare it with similar reserves in the north of the ACT. The earliest investigation conducted in 1975–1976 using pitfall traps to survey Black Mountain Reserve detected four species of frogs and eight species of reptiles. Records of a
further nine reptile species were obtained from other reliable observers. Since 2009, the calls of frogs have been monitored each year at five sites in the reserve as part of the annual Frogwatch census. This has provided information on an additional four frog species not detected in 1975–1976. Because of its proximity to institutions like the Australian National University and CSIRO it was
expected that other systematic surveys of frogs and reptiles would have been conducted in the Black Mountain area. Individual specimens have been lodged with museums from these institutions, and observations reported in a regional field guide, but there has been no more recent comprehensive survey. There has, however, been a substantial contribution to knowledge of the area's reptile and
frog fauna from community-based records such as the ACT Wildlife Atlas, Canberra Nature Map and the Frogwatch program. Black Mountain's herpetofauna is now known to comprise eight frog species and 22 reptile species. Two species of monitor lizard, one skink and one frog previously
recorded from the area no longer appear to be present. The contribution that the Black Mountain area makes to the conservation of frogs and reptiles in the ACT is significant, with the reserve supporting higher numbers of reptiles than have been reported from the Mt Ainslie – Mt Majura nature reserves (18 species) and Mulligans Flat – Goorooyarroo Nature Reserve (17 species).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe last 50 years informing the next 50
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018
EditorsRosemary W. Purdie
Place of PublicationCanberra, Australia
PublisherFriends of Black Mountain
Pages197-216
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventBlack Mountain Symposium 2018 - Canberra, Australia
Duration: 24 Aug 201825 Aug 2018
https://friendsofblackmountain.org.au/Symposium

Conference

ConferenceBlack Mountain Symposium 2018
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period24/08/1825/08/18
Internet address

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reptiles
frogs
mountains
conservation areas
fauna
herpetofauna
Scincidae
pitfall traps
lizards
wildlife

Cite this

OSBORNE, W., & Hoefer, A. M. (2019). Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain: Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping. In R. W. Purdie (Ed.), The last 50 years informing the next 50: Proceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018 (pp. 197-216). Canberra, Australia: Friends of Black Mountain.
OSBORNE, Will ; Hoefer, Anke Maria. / Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain : Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping. The last 50 years informing the next 50: Proceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018. editor / Rosemary W. Purdie. Canberra, Australia : Friends of Black Mountain, 2019. pp. 197-216
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abstract = "In this paper we review all available records of reptiles and frogs of the Black Mountain area in order to describe its frog and reptile fauna, and to compare it with similar reserves in the north of the ACT. The earliest investigation conducted in 1975–1976 using pitfall traps to survey Black Mountain Reserve detected four species of frogs and eight species of reptiles. Records of afurther nine reptile species were obtained from other reliable observers. Since 2009, the calls of frogs have been monitored each year at five sites in the reserve as part of the annual Frogwatch census. This has provided information on an additional four frog species not detected in 1975–1976. Because of its proximity to institutions like the Australian National University and CSIRO it wasexpected that other systematic surveys of frogs and reptiles would have been conducted in the Black Mountain area. Individual specimens have been lodged with museums from these institutions, and observations reported in a regional field guide, but there has been no more recent comprehensive survey. There has, however, been a substantial contribution to knowledge of the area's reptile andfrog fauna from community-based records such as the ACT Wildlife Atlas, Canberra Nature Map and the Frogwatch program. Black Mountain's herpetofauna is now known to comprise eight frog species and 22 reptile species. Two species of monitor lizard, one skink and one frog previouslyrecorded from the area no longer appear to be present. The contribution that the Black Mountain area makes to the conservation of frogs and reptiles in the ACT is significant, with the reserve supporting higher numbers of reptiles than have been reported from the Mt Ainslie – Mt Majura nature reserves (18 species) and Mulligans Flat – Goorooyarroo Nature Reserve (17 species).",
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OSBORNE, W & Hoefer, AM 2019, Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain: Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping. in RW Purdie (ed.), The last 50 years informing the next 50: Proceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018. Friends of Black Mountain, Canberra, Australia, pp. 197-216, Black Mountain Symposium 2018, Canberra, Australia, 24/08/18.

Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain : Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping. / OSBORNE, Will; Hoefer, Anke Maria.

The last 50 years informing the next 50: Proceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018. ed. / Rosemary W. Purdie. Canberra, Australia : Friends of Black Mountain, 2019. p. 197-216.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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N2 - In this paper we review all available records of reptiles and frogs of the Black Mountain area in order to describe its frog and reptile fauna, and to compare it with similar reserves in the north of the ACT. The earliest investigation conducted in 1975–1976 using pitfall traps to survey Black Mountain Reserve detected four species of frogs and eight species of reptiles. Records of afurther nine reptile species were obtained from other reliable observers. Since 2009, the calls of frogs have been monitored each year at five sites in the reserve as part of the annual Frogwatch census. This has provided information on an additional four frog species not detected in 1975–1976. Because of its proximity to institutions like the Australian National University and CSIRO it wasexpected that other systematic surveys of frogs and reptiles would have been conducted in the Black Mountain area. Individual specimens have been lodged with museums from these institutions, and observations reported in a regional field guide, but there has been no more recent comprehensive survey. There has, however, been a substantial contribution to knowledge of the area's reptile andfrog fauna from community-based records such as the ACT Wildlife Atlas, Canberra Nature Map and the Frogwatch program. Black Mountain's herpetofauna is now known to comprise eight frog species and 22 reptile species. Two species of monitor lizard, one skink and one frog previouslyrecorded from the area no longer appear to be present. The contribution that the Black Mountain area makes to the conservation of frogs and reptiles in the ACT is significant, with the reserve supporting higher numbers of reptiles than have been reported from the Mt Ainslie – Mt Majura nature reserves (18 species) and Mulligans Flat – Goorooyarroo Nature Reserve (17 species).

AB - In this paper we review all available records of reptiles and frogs of the Black Mountain area in order to describe its frog and reptile fauna, and to compare it with similar reserves in the north of the ACT. The earliest investigation conducted in 1975–1976 using pitfall traps to survey Black Mountain Reserve detected four species of frogs and eight species of reptiles. Records of afurther nine reptile species were obtained from other reliable observers. Since 2009, the calls of frogs have been monitored each year at five sites in the reserve as part of the annual Frogwatch census. This has provided information on an additional four frog species not detected in 1975–1976. Because of its proximity to institutions like the Australian National University and CSIRO it wasexpected that other systematic surveys of frogs and reptiles would have been conducted in the Black Mountain area. Individual specimens have been lodged with museums from these institutions, and observations reported in a regional field guide, but there has been no more recent comprehensive survey. There has, however, been a substantial contribution to knowledge of the area's reptile andfrog fauna from community-based records such as the ACT Wildlife Atlas, Canberra Nature Map and the Frogwatch program. Black Mountain's herpetofauna is now known to comprise eight frog species and 22 reptile species. Two species of monitor lizard, one skink and one frog previouslyrecorded from the area no longer appear to be present. The contribution that the Black Mountain area makes to the conservation of frogs and reptiles in the ACT is significant, with the reserve supporting higher numbers of reptiles than have been reported from the Mt Ainslie – Mt Majura nature reserves (18 species) and Mulligans Flat – Goorooyarroo Nature Reserve (17 species).

M3 - Conference contribution

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OSBORNE W, Hoefer AM. Frogs and reptiles found at Black Mountain: Fifty years of records, from museum collections to community-based photo mapping. In Purdie RW, editor, The last 50 years informing the next 50: Proceedings of the Black Mountain Symposium 24–25 August 2018. Canberra, Australia: Friends of Black Mountain. 2019. p. 197-216